the masters

Most of us have rules about our phones. No phones at the dinner table. No phones in the bedroom. No phones while flying, driving, or walking. Instead of a rule, let's make a choice. Let's decide to make connections with people, situations and experiences, and see how much better life is.
I think just about everyone thought that Jordan Spieth (including Jordan himself) was going to win his second Masters and become part of golf history this past weekend. That was until the 12th hole and the longest thirty minutes of a young man's life. As the world watched him struggle on the back nine and make a valiant attempt to recover, some parallels between golf and business struck me.
All he cared about was slipping into that green jacket. Instead of hitting a 40-yard hook out of a forest of Georgia pines
This year at The Masters, Tiger Woods was penalized two extra strokes because he and his caddy and apparently one of the
Two and a half years ago the world witnessed an athletic train wreck. Commentators and sports pundits jumped up and down on his grave, but I'm not sure those same "experts" were feeling so celebratory Sunday. After years, finally, Woods did something that used to seem so commonplace. He won.
McIlroy is undoubtedly the light at the end of the Tiger tunnel. But, McIlroy is not here to be Tiger. He's here to show that golf is alive and well, and that it isn't just surviving without Tiger winning every tournament -- it's better.