HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

theresa spence hunger strike

Anti-fracking protests, the growth of a movement, a hunger strike, an unprecedented turnout at a reconciliation walk and
Theresa Spence, who went on a six-week hunger strike last winter in an effort to persuade the federal government to take
From declaring a housing emergency last year, to a hunger protest in Ottawa, Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence has fought
Patrick Brazeau ridiculed Theresa Spence Tuesday night, less than a week after the Attawapiskat chief's Twitter account called
With a final media show, Chief Spence has now ended her 44 day "reduced food" diet. The question should now turn to what did she accomplish? Are Canadians more aware today and do they have a better understanding of the abysmal living conditions in First Nations communities? Probably not, such conditions were already well known and have been for decades.
The majority of people polled — 64.2 per cent — said they had heard of Idle No More, with 27.8 per cent saying they hadn't
Today's "National Day of Action" gives Chief Theresa Spence another opportunity to declare a victory over holding the government to account and another opportunity to call off her "hunger" strike. By not doing so she risks further polarizing and dividing the movement and First Nations leadership. The government is left with few options. It must still negotiate with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and National Chief Shawn Atleo, as it has to be seen to be engaged and working to make change possible, sooner rather than later.
Although a number of First Nations chiefs put pressure on her to end her crusade, Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, so far
This week Prime Minister Stephen Harper granted Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence's wish and met with First Nations Chiefs. But the still-hunger-striking Spence was one of many chiefs who chose to boycott the three-hour talks, in part because the Governor General would not be in attendance. So what to make of a leader who's willing to forego solid food for weeks to further her goal of meeting with the nation's leadership -- but who doesn't consider a conversation with merely the PM good enough? Apparently she's not an incrementalist.
Now that Prime Minister Harper is at least dragging his feet toward a January 11 meeting with aboriginal chiefs, we continue to see government and aboriginal leaders contradict each other about the effectiveness and sincerity of government efforts. The problem is a very complex one. Some of the complications result from imperfections in the performance of the aboriginal chiefs and some from imperfections in the performance of Canadian government chiefs. However, none will be resolved until both sides decide to talk openly and to trust one another. Did I mention that I am an idealist?