Toronto Politics

The housing crisis in Toronto brings into stark relief a fundamental quandary. As house prices skyrocket, we have hit a new
Instead of blaming foreign demand for prices that are rising because of government-imposed supply restrictions, the government should address how their own ideologically driven policies are contributing to the affordability crisis. But blaming others means the government doesn't need to change.
When someone we dislike passes away, we far too often revert to muted resignation. We purse our lips, dip our heads, and maybe mumble a few innocuous words of remembrance. It feels cheap to assail a dead man, especially when they're survived by a mourning family. So let's not assail Rob Ford The Man, but we should take a good hard look at Rob Ford The Character, or Rob Ford The Gimmick.
If it had been your friend or family member demonstrating the same behaviour your first reaction would be to get them help, but our first reaction towards Ford was to want him to lose his job, blackball him from society, and then we laughed some more.
The task force on Toronto Community Housing Corporation, headed by Senator Art Eggleton, has proposed bold strategic change. TCHC houses about one-quarter of Greater Toronto's tenants with low incomes, so its future is important for the health and social well-being of this city and region. Although our former mayor TCHC's problems on poor management, a new report makes it clear that the problems are broader and the fix must be strategic.
The city we love is at stake, and one wonders if our city ever dreamed we would arrive at such a critically defining moment
My point is simply this: Many want change in Toronto politics, but unless we start changing the way that media covers local council races, the same style of candidates will continue to be elected, we can no longer be allergic to the potential of something better, unlikely or fear something different in such a diverse city.
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was asked to leave an advance voting location on Saturday, city staff has confirmed.​ Ford had arrived
At City Hall, members of council and staff have done their utmost to fill the leadership vacuum. Toronto's non-partisan system, while messy, has allowed its city government to deliver with little disruption. Council and the City's senior management found equilibrium on a wide range of issues from transit to housing to electoral reform.
I was not prepared for what actually happened last night. Olivia Chow started off with vigour but then seemed to fade, John Tory was aggressive, and both attacked Doug Ford as if he were the frontrunner. There were no kid gloves for the debate newcomer. I think many observers may see this as the beginning of the end for John Tory, the much anticipated point where he begins to lose as he has done so often before.