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Transgender issues

Trans people struggle with employment, basic medical care, accessing things like housing and even public washrooms. Look around. Most of the services offered are categorized by gender, so trans people face constant barriers using them.
Indeed, Bill C-16 helps to redress incomplete protections for some of the most vulnerable women in Canadian society today: transgender women. For over a decade now, however, legislation aiming to protect transgender rights has stalled. Numerous lives have continued to be tragically impacted by discrimination, harassment and violence in the meantime.
Laws can make a huge difference in the lives of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) youth and children -- and yes -- laws can even reduce the bullying they experience. Transgender youth experience bullying at much higher rates than their cisgender (non-transgender) peers.
We strongly urge all Senators to pass Bill C-16 without amendment. Because human rights must apply to everyone -- acceptance and inclusion is not reserved only for those who are like us. Trans and gender diverse people face discrimination, harassment and violence in many aspects of their lives.
Our government has a duty to protect the human rights of all people. Laws that seek to enshrine those rights and protect us from discrimination should be considered without hesitation. If enacted into law, Bill C-16 will protect some of the most marginalized people in Canada and so, it is with all our might that we need to support its passing.
Transgender, gender nonconforming and intersex people are not sexual deviants. The rest of the population does not need protection from them. This line of thinking creates unnecessary fear at the thought of encountering a transgender or gender nonconforming person in a public restroom.
And they're actually answered by transgender people.
We need each other. We need these connections to survive and we need to talk about mental illness to share light and hope. We need to stop stigmatizing mental illness. We need to survive mental illness. You need to survive it. You have to keep moving. Keep fighting. Keep dreaming.
Freedom of speech does not only protect one's right to be offensive, it also protects individual and communities' right to express their diversity. By staging the debate, focusing on anti-trans and anti-black freedom of speech, the University of Toronto is inflaming the toxic environment its trans and racialized students are facing.
And he could not be more proud.