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transpipeline

Several municipal leaders in the Greater Montreal area have already deemed the pipeline too environmentally risky.
Including 28 beaver ponds.
I know that the term "ethical oil" has some blemishes on it because of issues surrounding its origin, but I believe in the concept behind the term. I want my personal gasoline purchases to go towards subsidizing medicare and not subsidizing a despot or paying for a tyrant to bomb his neighbour.
A seven-year saga comes to an end.
Just about every aspect of our lives involves a certain amount of risk, of course. It's all about risk management. And indeed, despite the occasional high-profile accident like last week's spill in California, pipelines in general remain very safe. One realistic alternative to transporting Canadian oil by pipeline is transporting that same oil by train or by truck. Yet both of these methods of transport are less safe than pipelines. Logically, then, we should transport as much oil as we can by pipe, and as little as possible by rail or road.
TransCanada's strategy to hoister its Energy East pipeline on the Quebec public has been unmasked, and Quebecers don't buy the company's sales pitch. Quebec citizens, not to mention citizens worldwide, have done their homework and based on the science, the facts and the statistics are keenly aware that the risks inherent in this proposed pipeline.
Pipeline and oil-by-rail industries are largely self-regulated and neither is held to high enough safety standards. Nor are they showing responsibility to communities by being forthright about the chemicals that are passing through waterways either by rail or by pipe.
The St. Lawrence Estuary beluga whale population is listed as threatened and protected under the Species at Risk Act, and has been officially protected by the Canadian Fisheries Act since 1979. We naturally run into concern when those trusted to protect these species are scrubbing their content to make it more friendly for oil interests who are rummaging around for an alternate route to the ocean.
Proponents of Energy East, from Stephen Harper to the Irving family in New Brunswick have called the Energy East project a "nation builder." The truth is, they may be right, but not in the way they're hoping
The U.S. State Department's report on the Keystone XL pipeline may pave the way for the project's approval but as for Alison