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trauma

Our fear of death disconnects us from our families and friends, when one of the good things about it is how it brings us together.
Insoluble grief, anti-Black racism and other forms of violence that Black, Indigenous and racialized people deal with can result in health issues.
If you recognize someone like this at your workplace, you might be better off looking for a job somewhere else.
And when they do connect with others, the relationships they form aren't always constructive ones.
If I asked you to close your eyes and imagine a car crash, it might play out like a movie scene in your mind: a car skidding down the road on dark, stormy night or rain pelting the windshield of an out-of-control car surrounded by darkness.
The main problem I faced was a distorted belief system. I felt that love came with accomplishments and accolades. I didn't believe that I was good enough to love as is. When love is missing, a lot of negative stuff comes out of the woodwork: anger, resentment, fear, jealousy.
I am looking for a light at the end of the aisle. This light is where consumer racial profiling is no longer part of the daily shopping experiences of many racialized and Indigenous consumers in Ontario. Each CRP story ends with the targeted person describing feeling left stripped of their dignity, humiliated, embarrassed, fearful and vulnerable.
Resilience has very little to do with surviving, and everything to do with awakening into where you are at this very moment. When we distance ourselves from, or anaesthetize ourselves against trauma and loss, we inadvertently diminish the potential breadth and beauty of our life.
We often think of resilience as a manifestation of the human spirit's ability to survive the unfathomable -- those grand disasters and tragedies that populate news headlines and our social media feeds. It's as though we don't believe resilience could possible be at play in the midst of our own "mundane" life.
When I meet people and tell them what I do, they often ask what the most common accidents and injuries are. Those who watch a lot of American TV imagine it might be gunshot wounds. Many people assume, particularly at this festive time of year, that the majority of victims end up in emergency due to alcohol-related car accidents. But even traffic accidents pale in comparison to holiday falls.