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tuition fees

The student was eating cookies when she got the news.
"Those vulnerabilities will be fully exposed in the next economic downturn. The time to act is now."
Thanks to the federal budget presented by Finance Minister Bill Morneau, we saw not the self-described feminist, environmentalist, progressive Justin T, but the reigning prime minister of austerity and broken promises. Clearly, "sunny ways" for the "middle class" are no longer part of his weather forecast.
Following Trump's executive order banning travellers from seven "Muslim-majority" countries, Canadian colleges and universities penned statements touting themselves as welcoming, inclusive and open. I for one am holding back my applause. This is an opportunistic marketing ploy to recruit international students as a source of revenue.
The Canada Child Benefit is a new program aimed at helping families with the cost of raising children today and into the future. This is the week when the cheques (or direct deposits) are set to arrive. I'm optimistic that the money will prompt some families to open up a Registered Education Savings Plan for their kids.
Are we a genuine focus, or was #PMJT merely appealing to student and youth voters by addressing our federal election campaign demands? Following a campaign with such a strong focus on young people, we should expect nothing less than Trudeau's promises to youth to be included in his first budget as prime minister.
Petty. One word that springs to mind after last week's B.C. budget. At best, it's a lip service budget. Tweak here, tweak
We're not waiting for parties to take us seriously, we're going to the polls to show them we're serious about electing candidates who make postsecondary education a priority in a meaningful way. We need to hear of plans for reduced tuition fees, increased access to grants and forgiven student debt. This election, students know the stakes. Students don't need to be convinced to vote for an abstract reason -- the truth is as a student, you must vote this election because if you don't, you're giving our next government permission to continue ignoring you and your future.
This year, Canadian undergrads can expect tuition will cost, on average and after other fees, will be $6,971, rising to $7,590 by the end of a four-year degree. Or an increase of roughly 8.5 per cent.
Is any of this relevant almost three years later? Yes, because mini-versions of the Quebec protests still play out on Canadian campuses. They may not be about tuition, and their ideological bent could be left or right. But too often when students organize around political causes they take on the same unsavory tones that reject dissent and make straw men of opposing arguments.