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tuition fees

Attention Canadian students: How is your German? If you’re tired of fretting about how to pay tuition as rates rise to record
The need for food support does not, however, stop with students under the age of 18. Post-secondary and recent university graduates are one of the fastest growing groups of food bank users across the province. With growing tuition rates, on campus living accommodations, and money for textbooks it's no surprise the wallets of students are being stretched to the limits.
Tuition fees for undergraduates in Canadian universities jumped an average of 3.3 per cent over the past year, StatsCan reported
Many reports suggest that upwards of 90 per cent of post-secondary students face high levels of stress and anxiety, mostly related to their finances, getting a job, personal relationships, and getting better grades. Clearly, students need help and feel there's no one providing it.
Yesterday... All my troubles seemed so far away... Those might be the words going round the head of Premier Pauline Marois
The Québec media has been buzzing over the announcement made by Léo Bureau-Blouin that he will run for the Parti Québécois during the next election.This will push the former FECQ president into a new kind of politics. Will he be able to continue the fight against the tuition fee hike in this forum? I loathe people who get involved in student politics as a springboard into partisan political life.
Universities are often called ivory towers -- elite institutions open only to those who can afford the cost. When Lloyd Axworthy took over as President of the University of Winnipeg in 2004, he resolved to throw open the tower doors to disadvantaged families in the surrounding communities, many of them aboriginal. He developed the Opportunity Fund, which turns post-secondary education from pipe dream to real possibility for aboriginal and low income students.
How ironic that the most extensive demonstrations we have seen to date in North America have concerned not unemployment, global warming, or the notorious one per cent, but the tuition that Quebec students have to pay for the benefits of a college education. Now two professors at the University of Montreal have likened Quebec to Putin's Russia.
The Canadian Grand Prix is a point of pride for this country, an event watched by millions from around the world. Little wonder then why the Quebec protestors, in dire need of a landmark event after their 100th day anniversary, would threaten to disrupt the highly anticipated race set to begin this weekend.
The distorted media coverage in the anglophone press of the Quebec student protest movement is perplexing. Some media pundits in the anglophone press not only fail to accurately present what is happening, but also use the occasion to express public disdain of Quebec social programs and of much of what Quebec society arguably stands for.