TV commercials

From a marketing share perspective, Firestone is eternally a brand stuck in the middle, unable to catch competitors like Goodyear and Michelin while never distancing themselves enough from other followers like Uniroyal and Cooper to carve their own niche. They are a brand stuck in the middle by their past hubris and their current marketing seems to never have escaped prior ownership.
Want to know one quick way to tell how different Canada is from the U.S.? It won't take long. Just watch a few TV commercials. They speak volumes. These days, it seems impossible to sell anything on U.S. TV networks without the use of explosions, interpersonal violence, gratuitous sex, car wrecks, or gunplay. It's almost a flip image of Canadian TV, where you see elements sadly lacking on American spots: humour, whimsy, subtlety, cleverness, intelligence. If you want a microcosm of what's wrong with the U.S. -- and what's right with Canada -- you couldn't find a better place to look than by watching their TV commercials.
The controversy over the new Cheerios ad is not about a fear of cross-racial contact in general, but the fear of a certain type of cross-racial contact -- that between black men and white women. To understand the specific nature of this particular racist outburst, we need to go back to slavery.
Television has always been based on two pillars: Destination. From "Must See TV" to your favorite sitcoms on Thursday night