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uber

Like most industries in today's business world, HR is seeing a significant impact from disruptive technology -- a term coined by Harvard Business School professor and author Clayton Christensen to describe any technology that changes or disrupts an existing technology or creates a whole new industry.
To some, it's the shared economy disrupting the old business models. To others, it's the gig economy that denies workers full-time hours and a living wage. Regardless of its name, the new economy is disrupting more than the established business norms. It is forcing grown-ups to live with their parents and is likely causing the decline in public transit ridership.
The purchase of a car is a significant expense for anyone, especially money-conscious millennials who are saving for the future and entering the phase of their lives with many large purchases ahead. Turns out, millennials are changing the scope of car ownership.
There's still a driver behind the wheel, for now.
While the city of Toronto passes rules to make it easy for ride-sharing companies to operate legally, the province of Quebec is set to make it so difficult that it chases those companies away. If the government does drive Uber out, it would constitute a significant harm to the thousands of Uber drivers, and hundreds of thousands of Uber riders, in the province.
It is not fair to put taxi drivers through strenuous regulations in order to be able to make ends meet and support their families, and then give a free card to their competitor and allow them to do the same job with almost no restrictions.
"These are families you're breaking up!"
Why is it when I get into an UberX car, the driver rarely knows which way to go? For those who have spent more than enough time being carted around by UberX, I can confidently say that you've likely found yourself in a navigational nightmare at least once (more so with a rideshare).
Blanket requests for data are overkill, company suggests.
Just the other day I climbed into Uber dressed in my military uniform. The driver asks for my advice: he recently became a Canadian citizen and wants to serve in our Canadian Armed Forces. I am hard-pressed to think of a time I felt as proud to be a Canadian.