HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

universal child care benefit

Justin Trudeau has enjoyed an extended honeymoon as a political celebrity on the world stage. He ran a campaign that promised so much and appealed to so many. Trudeau won our hearts and our votes, and after an extended period of Conservative rule, we were eager to see the new, fresh changes that his campaign promised. So after one year, it's time to sit down and ask ourselves: has Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivered on his promises?
"Unbelievable sense of entitlement."
As both a taxpayer and a stay-at-home mother, I am upset with the Trudeaus on so many levels. Not only is the Prime Minister clearly a hypocrite, but the fact that his wife (who seemingly does not hold a full-time job) requires not one, but two nannies is offensive no matter your political stripe.
There's been much hype and commotion since the federal government rolled out its revamped Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) last month. Dubbed 'Christmas in July', the change distributed nearly $3 billion to Canadian families, regardless of income, with children aged 17 and under.
While the Child Tax Credit was a nice boost for parents at tax time, you had to have earned enough income to benefit from it. As a non-refundable credit, it meant you had to have paid tax during the year in order to claim it. So a low income family may not have been able to take advantage of the credit. They did not actually benefit from it. This will not be an issue with the enhanced UCCB.
"There are going to be a lot of very angry parents when they go to file their 2015 tax returns."
Recent polling suggests the $4 billion in Universal Child Care Benefit cheques the Harper government is mailing out this
Both Treasury Board Guidelines and the Ethics Commission state it is inappropriate for a government official to blur the lines between a government and a partisan announcement. However, Minister Pierre Poilievre felt no apparent shame. He was quick to point out that neither the Liberals nor the New Democrats support the UCCB (a half-truth at best). Accordingly, he was not so subtly attempting to persuade an apparently gullible public that only the Conservatives could be trusted to protect families. It's not new for governments to attempt to play politics with taxpayer money; but vote buying has rarely felt more shameless.
"Everybody is out for a vote, and I understand that we are getting close to an election, but I would like them to have a good hard look at what is really in the best interest of Canada and Canadians across the income spectrum."
"He needs to recognize that he’s not a cheerleader for the Conservative party."