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university students

The trick to having a peaceful holiday time with your university-aged kids is to be mindful of the fact that they are different than when they left you
Thank you for the gracious pat on the back, BBC, but let's look at more data before policy makers and universities believe their "achievements."
As parents, we have been saving our hard earned money since the time our kids were born to pay for the high cost of education. Many teens have worked summer jobs to help shoulder the burden. So, how can you teach your kids to be financially savvy so they do not come out of college with more debt than necessary?
For many first year university students, orientation week, or 'frosh week', is a rite of passage -- a defining moment that gives you your first real glimpse into university life. It's an action-packed week that's high on fun, but like a colourful tornado ripping through campus, the week will be over in a flash.
One year ago this week, Alex Foto, a young woman who was helping change the world, was killed in a tragic accident while riding her bike. But this weekend, Alex's work will continue on through a dream she had: to hold a Canada-wide fundraiser to provide people around the world with clean water.
There are various reports about the amount of scholarship and bursary money that goes unclaimed each year. Some reports suggest that it could be over $15 million. While the exact number is hard to quantify, the point is there are millions of dollars that can be leveraged towards your future education. But where is the money, and how can you find it?
We can all think of excuses for postponing work on our personal brands. Students are overwhelmed with university work, and just want a few tips on how to sound credible to a recruiter. Thinking about the brand you are developing in a self-reflecting and strategic way is the antidote to finding yourself left behind.