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urban planning

Instead of simply telling people to spend more time exercising, we can incorporate it into their everyday lives.
It's not a job for one man or woman, it requires a team of expert leaders.
Single-detached houses in the 416 are getting hard to come by - equally in terms of affordability and supply. This new reality has given rise to different forms of high-density housing, which the Canadian Home Builders' Association refers to as "missing middle" housing.
For the doubters out there, Toronto's housing landscape is proof that Darwin's theory of evolution is, in fact, the real deal. As single-detached houses join the list of endangered species here in the 416, we're seeing the emergence of new forms of high-density housing, made to survive this storm of rising prices and dwindling supply, all by virtue of their very design.
Something happened in Toronto's housing market over the past year that really shouldn't happen in a free market. As home prices shot through the roof, the number of homes being built in the city dropped dramatically. Vancouver seems to be experiencing a similar problem. So what's going on here? Why is the supply of housing not keeping up with demand, even though there is so much money to be made? The answer, according to a growing number of experts, is that local policies and public opposition to development are killing off home construction, causing home prices to skyrocket.
The American elections are increasingly relevant to Canada. The dominant urban discourse is self-centered and dismissive of others whose economic and demographic realities have pushed them out of the unaffordable urban housing markets. The elites have willingly become ignorant of what transpires in remote small towns like Thunder Bay whose survival is linked to the consumers and commuters in large towns.
In less than 10 years, near-zero emissions homes and buildings will be the new normal in Vancouver. In addition to reducing emissions and energy use, the city's Zero Emissions Building Plan will lead to improvements in the quality of homes and buildings. This plan will be an important catalyst in the local, clean, low-carbon economy.
City planners and developers need to realize that building a good mixture of home types for people of different incomes and ages, with amenities for people at all stages of their life, is what make a stable, healthy, vibrant city, and one where people want to, and are able to, stay and thrive.
A successful public transit project is one that achieves a sustainable and sufficient ridership that could not be served by less expensive modes. The mere provision of trains operating devoid of riders is not a success but a failure resulting from putting 'progress' ahead of the process.
Currently 54 per cent of the world's population live in cities -- over 3.5 billion. Cities account for about 70 per cent of energy related greenhouse gas emissions (more per capita than rural areas). And in 2014, global CO2 emissions, which account for approximately 65 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions, were nearly 36 giga-tonnes.