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US border

After three years of feverish construction, the long-awaited Canada-U.S. wall has finally been completed. At a dedication ceremony held at the heavily fortified Detroit-Windsor border crossing, President Donald Trump and the Canadian prime minister jointly conducted a ribbon cutting.
Canada and the United States share the longest and most lucrative unmilitarized border in the world. It spans nearly 9,000 kilometres. There are 120 official crossings. Some 400,000 people move back-and-forth across that border every day. So does two-way trade valued at $2.4-billion every day. At one and the same time, we want the border to be safe and secure while trade across it remains a major source of economic growth and prosperity. If security concerns linger, the border thickens and the legitimate movement both of people and goods becomes more difficult.
When it was announced last week with big fanfare during the visit of Prime Minister Trudeau to President Obama in Washington that both countries plan to create within 60 days, a Redress Working Group to help resolve the false positive cases generated by the "No-Fly" list, it was not an indication that both countries are revamping their huge information sharing system, but rather a proof that the sharing of information will continue ahead at a bigger scale and with more sophistication and with of course "some bumps" on the way.
I pay American property tax. I depend on their health care system when I need it. I support U.S. charities. I shop in the U.S. I spur on the local economy as much as I can. I respect American ways, the flag, the veterans. I follow the rules and way of life every time I'm there. I am no longer a visitor to the USA. I am part of the national tapestry.
Plus one good reason to put up a wall.
Workers and industry face enormous regulatory burden when trying to move people back and forth between Canada and the United States for economic purposes. A workforce that is mobile, highly-trained and competitive with the rest of the world is a necessity in the new world economy. Why wouldn't our two governments facilitate the movement of skilled workers to work on major projects in both countries and help manufacturing (or technology) giants get the talent they need where they need it?
Independence and privacy: These are two very valuable things that we cherish in our daily lives; many of us have a habit of taking them for granted. But for those with mental illness like myself it appears as if we now have to fight vigorously to maintain our independence and privacy.
VANCOUVER - Todd Spaits believes his home state of Washington could one day be the Amsterdam of the United States, with everyone
Armed American police officers will now be able to stop Canadians, in Canada, inspecting, checking and asking questions. The Conservatives will tell us that an armed American cop in Canada is all about trade, jobs and security, not sovereignty. If this is true, then can we not expect to see Mounties stopping Americans on the Buffalo side? I don't believe Canadians want American police operating and carrying guns in Canada. It's just not right. Harper did promise though that when he's done, we won't recognize Canada. Perhaps we can all reminiscence about that when stopped and questioned by an American police officer, in our own country.
If you think the Canada-U.S. border is one of the most boring places on Earth, you're in for a surprise. A new video on the