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venezuela

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg The results suggested bacteria are continually in communication with one another. When times get dire, they attempt to find anyone who might have resistance and be willing to pass it on. Once there is a yes, a crowd appears, all hoping for the same gift. Once they get it, they head off to do the same.
All of the destabilization tactics are designed to convey the impression that the government is incompetent, and that it needs to be changed. Ultimately, though, widespread support is needed, and in this respect, the opposition -- though well-funded by the U.S. -- has so far failed.
You're a prisoner in your own home. Not able to fall asleep from the gunfire down the street, you fear that your house is next. You protested a new law that gave even more power to a despotic government. One of your friends was murdered, another was raped. This is a fear that has not played out in the western world. We have security, peace, and far more freedom than others.
The Conservative government has made the promotion and protection of human rights an integral part of Canadian foreign policy. Canadians expect their government to be a leader in the human rights field by reflecting and promoting Canadian values on the international stage. Venezuela should be no different.
It didn't take long for Harper to express his opinions about Chavez's government after his death. On the very same day that
Twitter is becoming a powerful threat to government because anyone, anywhere can participate anonymously and all voices are on an equal playing field. This tool's ability to quickly assemble groups from the comfort of one's home is making governments tremble.
Media around the world have devoted a great deal of coverage to the death of Hugo Chavez, who passed away last Tuesday after losing his fight against cancer. His legacy as the President of the "Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela" needs to be seen in the light of a long tradition of populism in Latin American history.
Rumors, secrecy and the hermeticism lasted until the last day before the death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. The government handled the illness of Chavez with emotionally charged messages, religious references and few medical details.
A petition organized by Liberal MP Jim Karygiannis to gather support for his future motion calling for an emergency debate in the House of Commons about the situation in Venezuela is gaining strength with each passing day.
Dozens of Venezuelans gathered last Saturday in a citizens' assembly across many of Canada's largest cities and demanded, in a public declaration, the restitution of constitutional order in Venezuela and that the sovereignty of their country be respected.