HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Vimy Ridge

Vimy Ridge's original oak trees were wiped out by intense shelling.
The events together emphasize "the importance of maintaining the rules-based international order."
We were welcomed by what I can only describe as peacefulness; only the sounds of rustling leaves and swaying trees could be heard even though the grounds were full of people. It was the polar opposite, I imagined, of what was going on in that same spot in April 1917, during the Battle of Vimy Ridge.
"Never again."
Vimy Ridge was a defining moment in Canadian history.
On April 9, 1917, 100,000 Canadian soldiers fought at Vimy and 3,598 of those died -- the most Canadian deaths recorded in the war. A century later, it appears many have forgotten their sacrifice. Worse still, many like me (until recently) don't even know they have a link to the battle.
Trudeau said he will be joined by Gov. Gen. David Johnston and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan.
As is often said, a photo can be worth a thousand words. The Vimy Foundation is working to help bring a human face to Canada's First World War history. In honour of Remembrance Week.... the Vimy Foundation is launching a unique and innovative project to colourize rarely seen images of the First World War, a project aimed at reengaging young Canadians on defining moments in our history.
Canada was not quite 50 years old when the battle was fought. As Canada approaches its 150th anniversary, and the battle its 100th, it is an important moment to contemplate the values we want to uphold, and the role we wish to play in the world.