vision vancouver

"I think it's important to remember what has happened to our city under 10 years of Vision Vancouver stewardship."
For the past 23 years, every 4/20 has been bigger than the last. Despite artificial controversy drummed up by the corporate media and hostile politicians, the fact is that 4/20 is a beloved civic event with widespread support and a broad base of participation.
The rezoning application to increase the height and bulk of the building to be erected on 105 Keefer Street in Chinatown
We have a civic government whose policies seem to be motivated more by sentiment rather than substance, and that's why we have record homelessness and a housing crisis which the city has steadfastly denied for so long.
Robertson wants a 70 per cent cut in natural gas use by 2020, and 90 per cent gone within 10 years. This will cost individual residents thousands of dollars -- and was approved by Robertson and his council without any thought to the affordability crisis in Vancouver.
For months the government had been in denial over the issue: overblown, isolated to a few neighbourhoods, it said. Since then its approach has gone from "the market will correct itself," to a "bold action plan," to legislating a retroactive 15 per cent tax on foreign ownership.
The city is putting a million dollars towards a mental health hub. Councillor Jang called it "a big health investment for the city." This hub will help about 5,000 people in need per year. How many people die by jumping from Burrard Bridge every year? The answer is .08 people, but the suicide barriers will cost $3.5 million.
These bylaws are so restrictive because they were written under the shadow of the Harper government. Now that we have the Liberals in power, and with such clear opposition to the current bylaws from the people of Vancouver, it is time for Mayor Gregor Robertson and Vision Vancouver to rethink their plan.
There's something about local government that brings out the worst in some people. Staff get spat on. Mayors and councillors are often the victims of what can only be described as cyberbullying. In some towns, process servers would be well-advised to offer volume discounts to local governments.
Hey, Mr. DJ! Keep playin' that song...