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Wall Street Journal

I was married to a liar for 25 years. At a very personal level, I have first-hand knowledge of the devastation lying creates in people's lives. I know that liars can be clever, charming, smug, and thoroughly convincing. There is a reason for their lying. In my case it was to hide a very big secret.
The Wall Street Journal's Facebook page posted a piece of 'news' early Sunday that appeared to fool no one. A fake report
People trying to help their family members struggling with severe mental illnesses don't have access to researchers. It's no surprise, then, that researchers ignore topics that reflect their perspectives on how to improve the mental health system. I hope they will consider the five areas discussed below.
"Not Business As Usual" contemplates a new era in business -- one that realizes business as usual has pushed the limits of our planet's capacity, while concentrating financial wealth in the hands of a too-small minority. The film celebrates ventures and entrepreneurs that refuse to sacrifice social good on the altar of shareholder returns. For them, healthy enterprises embody a significant shift in the underpinnings of business that is "bringing humanity back."
The global warming deniers are at it again, and it is high time that the environmental movement launched a campaign to expose them. We may not see effective action concerning climate change until many more business executives are convinced the changes are hurting both business and society.
I've been knee deep in the blogs lately so I'm paying a lot of attention to what's hot in that space. Diaperless parenting trends, mom blog conferences, innovative dads and a bathroom reno all caught my attention this week.
With Hurricane Sandy happening, the Wall Street Journal and New York Times took down their paywalls. The altruist might think these newspapers are helping the masses with a public service. The cynic might see a very different picture. What makes this situation both unique and different is how easily technology enables information to be free and shareable or locked down and private. With a flick of the switch these massive publishers control access to information. We can debate the good and the bad of this, but what is important is how instant the access is...or isn't.
Recently the Wall Street Journal told its readers that Canada is faring better than Americans, and that "Canada shows how mistakes can be reversed with sound policies." When outsiders remark that Canada is being well and responsibly governed, we in Canada could do worse than take note.
My admiration for Rupert Murdoch's boldness and acumen and our previous 25 years of more than civil relations make it unpleasant, despite his unspeakable assault on me, to have to conclude that he is deeply repressed and malicious man.
I am groggy with disbelief at the London Financial Times' suggestion that British justice should now, having preserved its virtue and a reasonable facsimile of due process for centuries, adopt the American plea bargain, at least in corporate matters.