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war of 1812

If Pauline Marois' government decides it wants to lead Quebec out of Canada, to my mind she's simply following the logical path that has been laid down (intentionally or not) by our Federal leaders over the past 145 years. If it turns out Quebec wants a divorce we should grant it and move on. It seems evident there wasn't much of a family to begin with, and we don't seem to want to start building one now.
As of this writing, Canada is 12th, with one gold, five silver and 12 bronze medals. Let us all bow our heads and listen up to what Jerry Seinfeld says: "You win the gold -- you feel good, you win the bronze -- you think, "Well, at least I got something". But when you win that silver it's like, "Congratulations, you almost won. Of all the losers you came in first of that group. You're the number one loser." So at least we have something. A lot of something.
2012-07-25-olympicbanner.pngI see the opposition parties have finally taken issue with the government for their heavy promotion of the War of 1812 during Olympic television coverage. The question is not the ad itself; the real issue is whether or not the Olympics are an appropriate venue for this type of saturation advertising? A simple ad highlighting the accomplishments of former Canadian Olympic greats would have been more appropriate.
Would the federal government please cut it out with their War of 1812 ads? One minute, I'll be watching some riveting event of sportsmanship at the Olympics, and then suddenly CTV cuts to commercial, and I'm treated to an array of cartoonishly noble characters attired in soldierly red coat and womanly bonnet, circa Regency England, with platoons aiming bayonets at the American frenemy, and I'm like: WTF, federal government?
Is this a trailer for a new action movie? No, it’s ‘The Fight for Canada.’ The Canadian government’s video made for the 200th
This year marks the bicentennial of the outbreak of the War of 1812, and it is right that Canadians recognize and celebrate its significance. To celebrate and commemorate only those parts -- indeed, those parts of parts -- of Canadian history that fit the talking points and policy direction of a particular government is to diminish the true greatness of the Canadian story.
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg It's been 1812-o-rama in the Canadian press this week: Experts agree that the main reason we should care about the War of 1812 is because without that "seminal battle" our beloved country would have suffered some other monstrous fate. And when you're done reading that stuff, check out the myriad articles on an email Minister Jason Kenney wrote wherein he inadvertently told the world what he really thinks of Alberta deputy premier Thomas Lukaszuk. Gripping stuff.
The Conservative government's multi-million dollar effort to ensure Canadians never forget the War of 1812 may have sidelined
The battle of 1812 was supposedly lost by the U.S. and therefore won by Great Britain. Apparently, it is true. But rebels in Upper and Lower Canada would continue to challenge the Anglo-Anglican Monarchists by waging a secret uprising in both parts of Canada that would end in 1838. It is remembered as the Caroline Affair.
The story of "Sobbing Sophia," a ghost in Niagara-on-the-lake, cannot help but touch your heart. I heard it for the first time when my wife and I decided to take a couple of days and travel there. The town is rich with haunted history, and if you take a look around you might just see something not of this world...