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water pollution

Washing them less is better for your jeans too!
Water contamination has been a long-standing problem.
They also detected antibiotics.
Legislation and regulations should also be developed, with First Nations as equal partners, to hold the federal government accountable
The Canadian Environmental Protection Act is Canada's most important environmental law. And yet, in the likely event that you are not an environmental lawyer, you have probably never heard of it.
Recently it came to light that Clark and her government officials have a bad habit of triple deleting emails and records that should be protected under the Freedom of Information Act. This isn't the first time this problem has come up during Clark's time in office.
On Saturday, September 19, more than 35,000 Canadians will be out in full force to clean up a shoreline in their community for the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup -- It's part of the International Coastal Cleanup Day, making it one of the biggest cleanup events in the world.
You wouldn't believe the looks of disbelief that we get. When my dive buddy Chris and I decide to spend a morning in Humber Bay, people are apt to ask whether we're serious about swimming in that part of Lake Ontario. One person questioned our sanity.
The approved EA measures are very complex, and will include freezing in place the huge underground dumps of arsenic trioxide which pose the greatest health risk. It is likely to take 25 years to freeze it all. The freezing system will have to be actively operated, forever. The arsenic will stay poisonous -- it does not improve with time.
Politicians are free to ignore the science, safety and history of hydraulic fracturing. But if the incoming New Brunswick government sticks with its election promise, it will outlaw (temporarily, at least) one of the more innovative ways to extract oil and gas in the 21st century. The science and risk-reward ratio are both on the side of hydraulic fracturing. The potential for a more dynamic economy is staring New Brunswick politicians in the face.