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Wayne Karl

More condo builders are coming up to speed in catering to this growing demand.
Are more increases in the offing? What does it all mean? How will it affect you?
The Toronto Real Estate Board's latest stats didn't do much to calm the nerves of hesitant homebuyers. Surging listings and double-digit sales declines have a tendency to do that. But, prospective purchasers, this may be the perfect window of opportunity for you to be out there looking for your next home.
Is Ontario's new Fair Housing Plan, comprising 16 measures designed to stabilize the real estate market while protecting homeowners' investments, actually fair? Or foul? Or is it a fail, even? Well, that depends on what part of the housing market you're in.
Budget 2017 proposes to invest more than $11.2 billion over 11 years in a variety of initiatives designed to build, renew and repair Canada's stock of affordable housing, and help ensure that Canadians have affordable housing that meets their needs. But so far it fails to address key market-related issues - again.
Spring has sprung, and while spring season is normally an occasion to celebrate, with days growing longer, weather getting warmer and real estate heading into busy season, everything feels a little different this year. Canada's real estate markets are dealing with myriad of issues.
By Wayne Karl Bryan Tuckey was on fire. Speaking at the Toronto Real Estate Board's (TREB) recent Market Year in Review & Outlook
Tight supply and strong demand will dominate the GTA market this year, resulting in double-digit home price growth, according to the Toronto Real Estate Board. While this forecast may be good news for existing homeowners, it might be the last thing prospective homebuyers in Toronto want to hear.
Now that Donald Trump has been sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, should we prepare for an onslaught of Americans moving north and buying Canadian homes? Don't bank on it. Americans cannot just pick up and move here because they don't like their new president.
Prospective homebuyers face a growing list of challenges -- from skyrocketing prices in Vancouver and Toronto, to soft conditions in Alberta, to another round of mortgage rule changes. But there are some good reasons 2017 is still a good year to buy a home in Canada.