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wedding etiquette

Don't know what gift to bring? We've got you covered.
The wife of his best friend suggested (actually, strongly insisted) that we demand a monetary contribution from our guests. My spouse and I disagree. I find this insulting, while he is hell-bent on it! Can we ask without insulting?
Wedding season is in full swing, and that means that bridezillas and groomzillas are about to terrorize the land once again. Demanding brides and grooms often end up alienating the very people they are supposed to be celebrating with, their wedding guests. Here's how to avoid becoming one.
Don't just toss your bouquet, share it.
Once upon a time, etiquette experts would have completely discouraged your daughter of asking for money. Untraditional and tacky, they would have tissed! Rest assured. As a modern manners maven, I know one thing for sure: etiquette evolves based on societal norms.
For starters, every first time wedding invitation has a gift obligation. The only exception is when you're a distant colleague, friend or family member, and you have not had any contact with either of the future newlyweds.
PREACH.
We've all been there — you're signing a card or a guest book and you just don't know what to write other than "congrats" or
UPDATE: According to the New York Daily News, the entire proposal was the bride's idea — because the woman getting engaged
We all know weddings are expensive, but it's not just brides and grooms footing a big bill. On average, guests are spending