widow

The proposal puts more money in the pockets of seniors 75 and up.
While the wait lists for long-term care homes continues to grow in Ontario, the number of seniors choosing to live independently in their houses and apartments is increasing, as we see on a daily basis. The key in all of this appears to be the ability to have the choice to do this.
I have no patience. I'm snippy, rude and have a short fuse. I think my kids' behaviour is atrocious. Is this because I am newly widowed and stressed out or am I just another mom dealing with kids? I don't know the line between what is normal and what is a result of our grief? I am confused, frustrated and feel like a failure as a parent.
My husband Matthew passed away from brain cancer last August. He was 39 years old. I now find myself a single mother of 3 young children. As I've started to heal over these last 6 months, I've been thinking a lot about friendship and the different people in my life.
Three months ago, my love died. Today is our seventh wedding anniversary. I am miserable. Distraction and over compensation has been a great (if not especially healthy) strategy for me. If I can't face the pain of loss at the moment, why not flip the script.
The truth is I don't feel 44 and I don't feel like a widow. I feel married and 80-years-old. In the past four years, I have aged tremendously, both physically, emotionally and mentally. And in my mind, I am still married. Mike has just been gone a little more than a month.
The grief is still there. But suddenly, from somewhere, almost eighteen months later, I do now occasionally experience the unadulterated joy that I never thought I would again. To my surprise,  I am no longer numb. The flowers in the park, a small child patting my dog, the flight of a bird, planning a visit with my grandson with his friends -- these things bring a lift to my heart.
I am moving through what I think of as the year of the terrible firsts. The first wedding anniversary without him; the first holidays; the first family celebration; birthdays, his, mine, our children's. And I move, inexorably, to the marking of the first anniversary of his death. In many ways, these months have been filled with surprises.
How does one trust in life again after experiencing two tragic losses? This is a question that I've asked myself since losing my son to stillbirth after a healthy 9-month pregnancy, followed just 18-months later by the death of my husband, a soldier serving in Afghanistan. How could I ever trust in anything again?