Wildlife conservation

As a northern nation that was mostly covered by glaciers only 10,000 years ago, Canada has fewer species than tropical countries where the evolution and emergence of new species has been operating in stable environments for hundreds of thousands of years. Tiny Panama has 10 times more tree species than Canada. Brazil has hundreds of more species on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species compared to Canada.
One of the most powerful tools of nature conservation in the 21st century is our ability to put the protection of Canadian species into a global context. By documenting Canadian species that are not just rare in Canada, but rare everywhere, we can better understand the role of Canadian conservation efforts in preventing global species extinctions.
The week of July 14 is designated National Shark Awareness Week. For over 400 million years, preceding dinosaurs by some 200 million years, sharks have ruled the oceans. Despite its enduring evolutionary run however, sharks are facing an immense threat from humans.
While B.C. salmon runs are greatly diminished from historic levels, what is left is world-class and definitely worth fighting for. Wild salmon face a multitude of challenges, but aquaculture is one which is entirely within our ability to regulate.
The Franciscana is one of the world’s smallest dolphins.
The Great Bear Rainforest Agreement was negotiated by such a diverse group of interests that at times consensus seemed all but impossible. Independent conservation science played a key role in bringing these seemingly incompatible interests to the same table. The science helped them find common ground when discussing how to manage and relate to this very special place.
"We’re talking umbilical-chord-still-attached, whoa-is-that-yep-that’s-the-placenta new-born otter pup."
Proposing a year-round open season on wolves primarily based upon anecdotal evidence from special interests who possess a self-serving intolerance of large carnivores, such as trophy hunters, is the antithesis of science-based wildlife management.
Killing more bears will do little to reduce nuisance bears while municipalities continue to allow plastic bags of garbage at curbside. Reducing attractants and learning to live with black bears is the solution -- not the expansion of a poorly monitored, scientifically unsupported and inhumane spring bear hunt.
In 1989, I flew to see the gorillas in Zaire. I was a determined 25-year-old; I had never flown solo across the world. It was always intended as a three-week window into adventure and nothing more. I needed to fully experience what lay one-dimensional in my university books.