wind power

Climate change is already costing Canadians money, and it will cost us more.
Renewable energy production jumped 17 per cent between 2005 and 2015.
North of Provost, Alberta, you can see the sleek figures of 17 wind turbines, each 80 metre tall, poking their heads above the aspen tree line. But these turbines are doing more than just keeping the lights on. They are powering the future of Alberta's children.
Wind too.
In 2015, the city of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, achieved the highest level of wind power integration in North America. While the province of P.E.I. is already a leader with 26 per cent of its electricity coming from wind power, the City of Summerside Electric Utility has ratcheted that up to an astonishing 46 per cent by adding a smart grid with energy storage.
Last week marked the 10th anniversary of An Inconvenient Truth, the Al Gore documentary that catapulted climate change onto the global agenda. Here's a quick look at developments over the past decade, both the inconvenient and the convenient.
As Alberta rolls out its climate plan this kind of deal starts to make more and more sense. Hedging yourself and your organization against future carbon risk is just the smart and money-saving thing to do. As other school boards and municipalities start to complain about the carbon tax it's worth holding up these 25 school boards as an example of what you can do to mitigate carbon risk.
The Alberta government's plan to phase out coal and ramp up renewables is unequivocally a good thing. Costs for renewables have dropped sharply and coal just isn't worth it when you factor in the health and carbon costs.
"Sunday’s spike in renewable output shows that wind and solar can keep pace with the demands of an economic powerhouse."
There are some who say PEI is tapped out on it's renewable energy, but after speaking to the energy minister, the CEO of the PEI Energy Corporation, Summerside's utility manager and Scott Harper of the institute it seems pretty clear PEI is determined to do more.