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wind turbines

Electricity is not a new electoral issue for Ontario Liberals. Here are some ideas Wynne can implement today that would address the chronic oversupply of expensive and unreliable electricity in the grid, lower prices for consumers, and keep prices competitive.
Last week marked the 10th anniversary of An Inconvenient Truth, the Al Gore documentary that catapulted climate change onto the global agenda. Here's a quick look at developments over the past decade, both the inconvenient and the convenient.
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." To see that quote brought to life we went to Cochrane High School in Cochrane, Alberta about a half-hour west of Calgary.
It would appear that Naomi Klein and her co-authors are oblivious to what's actually going on in rural Ontario. We are the backyard where all the wind turbines and solar farms are supposed to be built, providing "clean" renewable energy to clueless city dwellers. But guess what? We don't want these installations in our back yard either!
A small town of 16,000 people in southwestern Ontario, Tillsonburg's history is famously celebrated in Stomping Tom Connor's distinctive drawl when he sung about making seven dollars a day in the tobacco fields. But in 2009 the Green Energy Act spurred on the development of renewable energy with guaranteed rates for renewable energy producers.
The Environmental Review Tribunal continues to grind through its list of anti-wind appeals. On December 5, it rejected an appeal against the Renewable Energy Approval for another wind farm, Pattern Energy's South Kent Wind facility, 127 turbines between Tilbury and Ridgetown. In each of the appeals, the opponents have argued that approval of the wind farm will cause serious harm to human health. In each case, the Tribunal has found that this allegation has not been proven.
Some people living near wind farms in northeastern B.C. say their health has been negatively impacted by the turbines and
Heidi Eijgel is an Alberta horse farmer who lives in the last house at the end of a gravel road surrounded by one of the largest wind farms in Alberta -- and she's OK with that. In 2003, the 70 megawatt Summerview wind farm was built adjacent to Eijgel's property. She has been peacefully co-existing with that wind farm since then.
Change that comes this fast is not without controversy, but what's often lost in the hyperbole is the simple fact that Ontario has engaged thousands of citizens as well as small, medium and large businesses in building out the next generation of energy infrastructure.
I was saddened to read that Jeff Damen, a father of two and employee of a wind developer in rural Ontario, reported having a shotgun pulled on him while conducting field work on a project site in West Grey. While I am not known for expressing opinions remotely sympathetic to that of the wind industry or its employees, and certainly oppose the development of the project in question, guns and threats of violence have no place in any debate in our province.