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women in business

It took me 20 years to accept my body, after loathing it, fighting it and hiding it.
Here's the thing: being nice and being assertive are not mutually exclusive.
When I face a challenge or need reenergizing, the stories and examples of fearless female professionals help me recalibrate.
Canadians of all political stripes have embraced the importance of progressive trade, particularly with respect to gender rights and Indigenous issues.
We need to understand that representation matters, and girls of any shape, size, and personality can be successful in STEM fields.
Growing up, I was a precarious, hourly paid shift worker. Many times in my early-to-mid 20s, I was faced with too much month at the end of the money. The gig economy model of work did not yet exist, and with rigid shift scheduling and strict employment processes, I had to rely on loans to make ends meet. Since then, my belief has not changed: This is not the way new entrants to the labour market should start their careers.
Today's business landscape is constantly evolving. Despite this rapid evolution, however, it can still sometimes feel as though the changes we desire are not happening fast enough. These feelings are especially true when considering topics like career progression and, most recently, women's leadership.
My bookshelves were heaving with the weight of a ton of new business books on operations, marketing, hiring, and relationship management. When I wasn't teaching or taking care of my mom I was preparing the business and hiring documents and researching ways to automate the scheduling, reporting, and invoicing. Preparing for day-to-day operations will keep a business running, but to prepare it for liftoff, long term planning is key.
We live in a world of increasing tension and polarization. Everything in our lives is compared and labelled; good or bad, happy or sad, beautiful or ugly, rich or poor. Unfortunately, categorization encourages the belief that if one side is right then the other is wrong.
We live each day according to our stories about who we are, what we do, the people we support and where we spend our money. It is natural that we see and believe information that supports our beliefs and ignore that which does not. Unfortunately, once our stories are established we hunker down and close ourselves off from any other possibilities.