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women in business

A large part of wellness is equality. When an organization develops feelings of pride, trustworthiness and respect, as well as welcoming ideas and building good fellowship, it will encourage women to move past the glass ceiling and create a foundation that can reduce stress and mental-health issues in the workplace.
I'm often asked what we can do to reach true equality - a world where women and men were equally represented in everything from government to business. If I had to pick one single thing we could address, I'd say confidence. Simply put - men have it. Too often, women don't. On this International Women's Day it's important to celebrate and recognize successful women. Young women, girls need to see others succeeding in fields that traditionally have been dominated by men. It's important for young women to see other women in politics and government.
International Women's Day provides us with an opportunity to reflect on the achievements and contributions of women and how they continue to shape the future of women in leadership. There are two key areas that stand out in my mind that are crucial to moving the needle for women in leadership in the future.
On International Women's Day, when countless statistics will be cited and discussed to highlight how far we've come towards gender equality, there's one number that keeps me awake at night. Twenty-one. Despite our best efforts as an incubator for tech startups in Canada, only 21 per cent of our founders are women.
Current gender theory has shaped two distinct types of leaders. On one hand are women leaders who are expected to be collaborative, empathetic relationship builders, and on the other men who are expected to be assertive, action-oriented and focused on the bottom line.
Magnetism is not reserved for stars of the silver screen alone. It can be found amongst the people that we live and work with as well. So, what are some of the traits of those with presence? And what is that 'it' characteristic that makes people stand out in a crowded room?
I know I'm stating the obvious to my fellow Canucks, but there are a few tried-and-true Canadianisms that have served me well, both professionally and personally (and perhaps that Internet troll of a U.S. president-elect might consider trying them).
This week I was on a panel at a professional association to talk about business networking. In my mind business networking
Women are breaking through in the very place where their numbers will not only make gender parity a reality in the next 10 years, but where the breeding grounds of gender dominance are all pointing in the same direction. I mean, of course, Canada's universities.
From the time we enter high school we are told that this type of talk is harmless, good-natured joking and if we react negatively, we must lack a sense of humour. What we fail to mention is that locker room talk leads to groping and unwanted sexual advances because when you dehumanize people in conversation, their needs no longer count. Once you have obscenely torn a woman apart with bro-talk, an insidious web of disrespect is woven. It becomes difficult to promote her and even more difficult to work for her. In short, it limits her opportunities.