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women in business

At first glance, it's easy to rattle off the usual suspects; creative, fierce, independent... you get the picture. But the "FIVE I AMS" game really caught me off guard because I had never actually stopped and thought about "what I am."
Just like a vegetable garden, when you start a business you tend to offer a broad range of services and products because you are really not sure what will take off or what will prove most popular. But don't choose something you don't like to do, or in our case, like to eat, like the radishes. It's a waste of your time.
Women are more patient and are prepared to wait before finalizing the sale, which men would likely argue is not time efficient. But if in the long term it nets the same result, who is to quibble over the strategy to getting there?
In a recent survey of women entrepreneurs we asked what was their biggest challenge was. Consistently the answer was finding customers. In this tight economy, finding customers is crucial to staying alive, but sometimes it pays to think longer and deeper about who would make the perfect customer.
If you are doing well and the other person is not, jealousy can raise its ugly head, eating away at the bones of the friendship until they are raw and bare. And while I hate to speak ill of my sex, sometimes with a group of women it feels like we are back in high school. Well, I've graduated and want no part of it.
It's a changing world of business, and if our businesses are to survive, we need to be flexible and prepared to change how we do business. It's time to reflect, rethink and redesign what we do.
It's been referred to as "an unlikely weapon in the war:" a joyous fragrance at the beauty counter made from organic essential oils that help farmers in Afghanistan get off of the illegal poppy crop that accounts for 90 per cent of the world's heroin supply.
There are over 900,000 women entrepreneurs in Canada, and while women are launching businesses at a faster rate than men, in the long term their businesses do not grow as fast as their male counterparts, which led us to ask why?
When I look at the partnerships that haven't worked, I can see now that part of the reason why was that we didn't share the same values. We hadn't taken the time to really get to know one another -- to discuss our vision, or to agree on goals and the desired outcome.
I know when my children were young, I intentionally put my career on hold. I just instinctively knew I couldn't handle both, and my children were my priority. But I also don't think we should become martyrs to motherhood either and I recognize that taking a break or reducing your involvement can limit your future success.