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women in business

Many successful executives will credit a mentor; an adviser, a teacher, someone who kept them engaged while they advanced their careers. Maybe even someone who opened doors as they learned the ropes. This is especially true for women.
I've had the privilege of working with motivational women for years and being included in this category is truly humbling. Being a career woman myself I often am asked the secrets to success.
The opposite of "success" is NOT failure. If you don't succeed -- you have GAINED a learning opportunity.
One of the hard realities of retiring so young from such a competitive industry is that your personal identity is often so intertwined with your professional personality that it's hard to separate the two. I found myself asking "who am I, if not the skier?" It was like starting from scratch.
Many traditionally male-dominated industries in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics are implementing new policies and actively trying to attract women to the field. Finding a sustainable work-life balance as a professional woman is a struggle many face, regardless of industry. But the attitude towards women in architecture needs to shift to remove barriers to success, increase diversity in leadership and motivate the industry to design for a better future.
What makes us hate has been theorized since the beginning of time. Shakespeare wrote about hate and violence. But what is rarely discussed is what we need to do beyond the wailing and the gnashing of teeth. It all starts with how we run our business, our schools and our governments.
My female entrepreneur friends and I have discussed this in the past. This topic seems to somehow seep into our conversations from time to time. What does it mean to use your looks in business? How does that work? In general, we know humans respond well to good looking people. That's a fact. Being pretty can bring out opportunities and get people's attention.
Mostly, your subconscious is an obliging, industrious little helper that has your best interests at heart. It really wants
In recent years, the world of employment has evolved to such an extent that it will never be the same. The workforce is aging, new technologies are changing the way we do things, globalization reduces the effects of borders and the availability of information promotes competitiveness. These conditions have triggered several significant changes that are transforming the employment industry.
Other people my age seem to have "missed the memo" about technology, entrepreneurship, and active aging. They spend hours complaining about how the world has changed, how tough millennials are to work with, and how much their muscles and bones hurt. I try to either inspire or avoid those people.