HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

women in the workplace

A poll from Randstad Canada has found wide discrepancies in attitudes between women and men, and old stereotypes persist.
And women who work long hours are especially at risk.
It's often suggested that women become "soft" and unfocused if they become mothers, but being a mom can actually improve your job performance.
According to Statistics Canada, the proportion of women working in the funeral industry has nearly doubled since 1995. And at Humber College today, women comprise about 75 per cent of students who enrol in the funeral services program. There are a few reasons why the time is now for more women to get involved in the funeral industry -- and why a career in this field shouldn't be overlooked.
The information technology industry is one of America's most thriving sectors, according to a plethora of industry experts
When we realize that such a large portion of our time is actually spent at work, one would think we would be motivated to make this time as pleasant as possible. However, many of us know that this is not always the case. Most people have some sort of war stories from work that involve a difficult coworker or boss who seems bent on making our lives miserable.
Motherhood is often treated as something we can do on the side, while we keep charging ahead with our preconceived plans about what other parts of our lives will look like. The thing is, none of us actually know what we're getting into. We are out of our minds to think that caregiving and child rearing are invisible, background and secondary.
When it comes to women in tech, we know there needs to be a shift in attitude. Especially for females first entering and aiming to follow a progressive career path. While many emerging into the industry from technology programs worldwide, once in their field, there is still little advancement into upper management positions.
The key to building self-confidence is repeated practice coupled with persistence. Help women on your team overcome self-doubt by inviting them to contribute to the conversation, whether they are in classroom or the boardroom.
Creating work environments that reflect the reality that both women and men are working and raising children is critical to not only women, but to the competitiveness of the economy. We are not maximizing the talent pool when 50 per cent of the population is absent from the vast majority of leadership roles that shape our economy.