women's bodies

I'd been teased mercilessly from about grade four or five on about the smallness of my breasts -- good, honest B cups, but they were not the favoured size of my youth. So I came to a logical conclusion: I stopped wearing a bra. Why bother, if no one's looking? I did mention I was naive.
Sadly, by addressing their reproductive health decisions openly, American women still run social, civil, and human rights risks that Canadian women no longer need to worry about. Additionally, in the U.S., if a woman speaks out about her body, she risks being pinned with moral connotations. Why? Because the subject of a woman's body is still claimed by both church and state.
Dove is back with yet another ad campaign that has us reaching for our tissues and re-evaluating how we talk about body image
It's no secret that women's standards of beauty are constantly changing. The past year alone has seen Hollywood worship thigh
No thigh gap? No problem! Now the most sought-after trend is coming to a store near you! In a genius ad made by comedy group
One group of women is showing us just how empowering our nakedness can be! The University of Wyoming's “Real Women, Real
Rihanna recently had her Instagram account deleted after posting one of the topless photos from her very racy, very stylish spread in Lui magazine earlier this month. Even though Instagram maintained it was an accident (who in their right mind would piss RiRi off on purpose?) and reinstated the account, it had still been wiped squeaky clean.
Two things really pissed me off this week. The first is the response to Lisa Boncheck Adams' battle with Stage IV metastatic breast cancer. The second is Lena Dunham's apparent unacceptable and random naked body. They are public figures, and that seems to entitle whoever feels they have value to add, to have a go at them.
We're used to seeing stick-thin models in the pages of magazines and on billboards but what if fashion advertisements actually
Let's look at our world in 2013 in a nutshell, where rape and the assumptions that women 'want it' are made constantly. And yes, women are showing their bodies... we know that. Assuming women are being looked at, and knowing full well that the fashion and entertainment, porn and social media industries are a big part of all our lives in developed nations, I think it follows that it is more effective to educate men about their privilege as 'watchers' than to shame women for revealing our bodies. Maybe women's bodies are also for swimming, being good people, playing, walking, being strong, being free?