work stress

Just stop and take a breath before you think about venting.
"A more chilled-out you is a more productive you."
I have always approached achieving a work-life balance like investing for the long-term. Just as market volatility means every day can't generate gains for your investment portfolio, you can't expect to perform professionally at peak levels all the time. Don't be too hard on yourself and expect professional perfection and growth all the time. Like successful, long-term investing, a life well-lived requires balance and consistency between home and office.
That unsettled feeling you or your co-workers have? That feeling of being overwhelmed? It's stress. Stress because you don't have the authority, resources and/or skills and knowledge necessary to meet your responsibilities. Stress that you won't be able to do the things expected of you, that you will have to settle for poor quality work, or that you will let someone down. And this stress can be managed.
Lisa called me to get some advice about a colleague named Wendy whom she called a drama queen. (Both names are pseudonyms
During the same four year period of chronic illness and injury, I made a radical and terrifying career change, went through a devastating divorce, sold the only home I ever owned, tried to force myself to finish a PhD I hated, lost almost all of my money, and had a personal identity crisis.
I work from home on Fridays. It feels like such a treat. I don't set an alarm, so I wake up when my body wants to. I shlepp around in jogging pants and I spend the day writing or working on administrative stuff. I take a long lunch and I enjoy a manicure or a hot bath or a sunny stroll. I love that I can do that.
If you're feeling frustrated or exhausted or stuck in your career, maybe it's not your job that's the problem. Maybe it's you. I may be right or I may be wrong, but you should at least consider the possibility. A lot of people bring a lot of baggage with them to work.