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workforce

The unemployment rate fell to 10.2 per cent.
Students were surveyed by employer-branding company Universum Global and it seems they really want to get into tech.
Thanks to the unprecedented pace of change in the market, we are now at a moment where anything is possible. To seize this opportunity, it's important to recognize that the power base is shifting. The new technology buyers of today have extremely high expectations, and increasingly, only want to do business with companies that mirror their own diversity.
Weak growth necessitates that we use all of Canada's assets to reignite our economy. Yet, data are assets that have yet to be effectively leveraged. While we fixate on the numbers of startups or high growth firms, do we really have adequate data with which to build a resilient labour force or an innovative economy?
Although clearly a critical factor, pointing students in the right direction is only half the battle. The other half must be improving collaboration between government and industry to develop tangible solutions to strengthen the future workforce. As far as we're concerned, that time is now.
In many respects, the Council of Canadian Innovators is failing to understand the new dynamics of today's information economy. Indeed, individuals cannot be treated as replaceable widgets. Instead, they must be treated as individual contributors who have the capacity to individually contribute to innovation and growth within an organization.
More so than any other time in the history of the post-industrial career, how work happens can be tailored and adapted to reflect individual needs and goals. Make the most of these opportunities by investing the time to create the foundations for your own version of a successful gig career.
Culture says that women ought to be homemakers, look pretty and that they're prizes to be "earned" by men. But culture is learned, and in no small part via popular media. Americans spend on average five hours daily watching TV, for example -- lots of time for media to cultivate unconscious biases.
With her intention to take a year off -- more formerly known as a "gap year" before starting at Harvard in 2017 -- now a matter of public record, President Obama's eldest daughter's decision comes with it the predictable flood of raised eyebrows, analysis and opinion.
Getting back into the workforce after spending time at home with kids has always been a challenge. But today, with the proliferation of social media, it can be an additional hurdle to turn what have been your personal musings and reflections on life into a professional online profile as you hunt for that perfect job.