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workopolis

Recruiters read each resume for an average of 10 seconds.
It's probably unlikely that we'll see an influx of Americans moving north, but in the short-term, they're certainly exploring the option. The bad news for them is that they might find getting a work permit much more challenging than they expected.
In a job interview, employers will be looking to see how savvy you are, how confident you are, and how personable you are. There will be some questions about your work experience and skills, of course, but if the prospective employer didn't think you could do the job, they wouldn't waste time interviewing you. What they really want to see is how you handle pressure. How well you can communicate. If they like you. And that decision is made quickly, often in their very first impression.
Counting on your cover letter is shooting yourself in the foot. Your resume itself has to be customized to every job you apply for -- highlighting your core credentials that are most relevant for that specific job.
"Oh gimme a break, not another 'results-oriented, hard-working, team player.'" Self-descriptions like these turn up in so many resumes that they don't serve to differentiate candidates anymore. In fact, they have the opposite effect by making the job seeker appear generic and cookie-cutter. Stop trying to describe yourself.
It's not the actual interview questions that cause difficulties for candidates. It's understanding why the interviewer is asking them in the first place. What is it that they really want to know? The information that employers are after is often quite different from the literal answer to the question asked.
When looking for a new job, timing can be everything. February has more job openings becoming available and fewer applications for them than January. From now through the spring could be the right time to make your move.
It could have been worse. That’s pretty much the best anyone can say for Canada’s job market in 2015, which managed to stay
There are three phone numbers on my business card: my cell, the landline and, a fax number. In my fifteen years of professional working life, no one has ever faxed me. Speaking of business cards, they're done too. Social media profiles are the new business cards.
While the content is ostensibly what you have done in the past, the real subject of your resume should actually be what you can do in the future. Your past accomplishments as evidence of your future potential. There's really only one skill that matters at the end of the day. It is your ability to achieve results -- they care about what you can do with what you know.