HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

World Bank

"We need a comprehensive rewriting of the rules of the economy."
Empowering women is the right thing to do — it is a question of human rights. But it is also the smart thing to do.
Over 2 billion people, and a growing share of the world's poor, live in the 35 countries considered fragile or conflict states in 2016. And whether we are talking about pandemics, war, or prolonged occupation, these conditions devastate health systems and have lasting impacts on the physical and mental health of affected populations.
Occupation can take many forms. It does not necessarily imply a military presence or military domination. For example, in India right now, there is a drive to get genetically modified (GM) mustard sanctioned for commercial cultivation; this would be the first GM food crop to be grown in the country.
These enterprising, entrepreneurial and gutsy women play a major role in supporting families in Pakistan, yet officially, they are invisible. A large number of these women are often poor and engaged in either home-based economic activity or agricultural work leading to a lack of documentation.
The case before the Supreme Court hinged on whether the World Bank and its officials should need to cooperate in a case involving Canadians accused by World Bank whistleblowers of conspiring to corruptly win a World Bank contract for a Bangladesh bridge-construction project.
Continuing legal differences between the entitlements of men and women in economies across the globe has a negative impact on female work force participation. Some say that women should suck it up, and do a different job. Why? If men are entitled to pursue any career they like, why shouldn't women have the same opportunities?
For the 10th year in a row, Singapore has been named the best country in which to do business by the World Bank. The bank’s
Pakistan is a diverse country and females account for a large portion of the population. Recently, it has becoming increasingly difficult to discuss the challenges that Pakistani women face. There is a dire need to promote the education of females by launching awareness campaigns at the national level, because in order to educate a nation, you need to educate its women.
The climate is changing. For some of us this means less quality food, less choice and higher prices. As today's World Bank report notes, for millions, it means being pushed into poverty. And for millions of women already living in poverty, it means more hunger.