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Immediate relief from U.S. duties is "unlikely," B.C.'s premier says.
Surprise: The long-outlawed practice of "zeroing" is suddenly legal.
But currency traders could defeat the proposed border tax.
Many of the promises -- increased productivity, more jobs, more money in our pockets -- have simply not come true. This is ironic because, as free trade agreements become toxic all over the world, Canada, a country bound by a long-standing trade deal, has not had a comprehensive debate on the proposed CETA (trans-Atlantic) or TPP (trans-Pacific) agreements.
Much attention is paid to the fact that, like its predecessors, the Paris Agreement is "toothless" because it isn't backed up by an enforcement mechanism. This pessimism is understandable. Without clear and binding targets, how can any of the signatories be assured that their sacrifices will lead to meaningful emissions reductions? How can they know that the potentially difficult transition towards renewable energy will be a shared burden? The bad news is that the Paris Agreement is unlikely to introduce strict targets or develop an enforcement mechanism in the foreseeable future.
Controversial U.S. rules that requires meats’ country of origin to be labelled are behind the Canadian government’s threats
Stability, peacefulness, politeness and a welcoming atmosphere go a long way when considering a nation in which to settle down and raise a family. When you are contemplating flinging free on vacation, those qualities aren't as enticing. So, what do you do if you need to become more attractive? Here are some thoughts.
We haven't heard much out of the World Trade Organization since 2005, when the US government decided to continue subsidizing corporate farms rather than forge a global trade deal. Yet the WTO machinery keeps grinding on -- and grinding poor countries down.
On top of the generalized global interest about Argentina's move to nationalize its largest energy company YPF, the majority owner of which had been the Spanish energy company Repsol, there is a special local twist as the Mexican President Felipe Calderón has been particularly critical of Argentina's move calling it "very regrettable."
Given the European Union's occasionally expressed but steady desire to define their role in the world apart from the United States, and given the eurozone's relative weakness right now, a close relationship with China may be seen as the only non-U.S. alternative for them to pursue.