HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

xi jinping

Faced with a choice between prosperity and stability for Hong Kong or sovereignty over it, Beijing will always opt for the latter — no matter what the cost.
We in Canada, along with many other people around the world, did not get to vote in the recent American election -- yet we are meant to suffer the international consequences of it. Shall we sit back, as usual, and watch events unfold, including the possibly catastrophic effects of climate change left unchecked?
What does this mean for Canada? First and foremost, it means a reinvigorated green crusade for renewables, which can only harm Canada's economy, as we showed when Ontario took this path. In addition, the green movement will likely use this agreement to push for other harmful policies such as a national carbon tax. The U.S.-China agreement will also reinvigorate green opposition to Canadian fossil-fuel production of all sorts: the no coal, no gas, and especially the no oil sands people will be using the new announcement as a cudgel with which to demonize anyone who opposes them.
There is a famous Chinese curse that goes "may you live in interesting times." The government ushered in some interesting
Chinese President Xi Jinping's sweeping campaign to root out graft and curb abuse of power is now trained on the Three Gorges Corporation, the state-owned enterprise that built and operates the world's largest dam.
For most countries, a citizen receiving the prestigious Nobel Prize is a source of pride and honor. But it was not so for China when the Nobel committee honored Liu Xiaobo for his nonviolent efforts to promote democracy, reform, and openness in China.
China's growth, while enviable, is slowing. But power is opaque here, a problem in a globalized world, and the government controls information flow. It in the midst, like America, of a power struggle over who will run their nation. America is undertaking a noisy and disruptive election process while China is undergoing a power struggle behind closed doors as to who will run the superpower for the next 10 years.