The XL Foods beef recall has been updated a few times since last week. The ever expanding recall, also the the biggest in Canadian history, has some new additions to the list.

Some of the recent additions include T & T Supermarket stores in Edmonton, certain 49TH Parallel Grocery stores in B.C. and Reg's Homestyle Meats and Deli in Medicine Hat, Alta.

An updated list of products recalled due to the E. coli threat is below. You can also find a list of the recalled products on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

The USDA also has a full list of American retailers that may have received shipments of Canadian beef.



Looking for additional ways to prevent E. coli? Some tips from the experts:

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  • Cook all ground beef and hamburger thoroughly. Also remember to check to make sure the meat isn't pink inside, since ground beef can turn brown on the outside before disease-causing bacteria are killed. Use a meat thermometer to ensure the thickest part of the meat are cooked to at least 160 degrees F. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • <span style="text-decoration:underline;"></span>If a restaurant serves undercooked meat send it back to be cooked thoroughly. About.com recommends asking for a new bun and clean plate too. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • Ensure your kitchen is kept clean to prevent spread of bacteria. Always keep raw meat separate from ready-to-eat food and wash hands, counters, thermometers, and utensils frequently. Also NEVER place cooked meat back on a plate that you kept the raw meat on. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • Drink only pasteurized milk, juice, or cider. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • Drink water that has been treated with chlorine or other effective disinfectants. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • Avoid swallowing lake or pool water when swimming. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

  • People suffering from diarrhea, especially children, should use extreme caution. Wash hands with soap (and after changing diapers) and avoid swimming in public places, sharing baths or preparing food for others. Source: http://pediatrics.about.com

Related on HuffPost:

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  • While most strains of E. coli are harmless, the Public Health Agency Of Canada warns that some strains including E. coli O157: H7, can make people sick, and in serious complications can include kidney failure.

  • Symptoms include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and fever that is generally less than 38.5˚C/101˚F and tend to last for five to seven days.

  • High risk individuals include the very young, elderly, pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems.

  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can be fatal, can develop in around 5 to 10 per cent of those who get sick from E. coli O157:H7 overall and about 15 per cent of young children and the elderly. Symptoms of HUS vary. Some people have seizures or strokes and some need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis. Others live with side effects such as permanent kidney damage.

  • Proper hygiene including hand washing and safe food handling and preparation practices are recommended to prevent the illness.

  • While E. coli is generally associated with ground meat, Alberta Health Services warns that the bacteria can also be found in foods including poultry, pork, cheese, sprouts, lettuce, yogurt, and unpasteurized milk and fruit juices and advises Albertans to take precaution.