The family of Lori Bowcock, the border officer who was shot at the Peace Arch crossing, sends their thanks to her colleagues, medical staff and public agencies for their support as she recovers with a "positive outlook and sense of humour."

The family issued a statement Thursday, two days after Bowcock was shot in the neck by a man who then turned the gun on himself.

Officials have identified the man as Andrew Crews, a tattoo artist from Seattle. Investigators are still looking for a motive to the shooting. Crews' family told media that he texted his mother on the morning of the shooting: "I love you so much. I'm sorry." They could not reach him after that.

"Lori acknowledges how difficult this time must be for the family and friends of Andrew Crews. Our thoughts and prayers are with them," said the Bowcock family on Thursday.

They said that Bowcock has always wanted to work in law enforcement and that her posting to the Peace Arch border crossing in July is considered part of her dream career. Bowcock has previously worked as a 911 operator in Ontario.

She's expected to make a full recovery.

The Peace Arch, officially known as the Douglas crossing, is the third-busiest point of entry between Canada and the U.S.

Bowcock Family Statement

Since Tuesday’s events, we have experienced every possible emotion. Today, we are grateful that Lori is alive.

She is doing well and we are happy to report that her positive outlook and sense of humour are shining through. She remains in stable condition, and we are optimistic that she will make a full recovery. We would especially like to thank the first responders, including her co-workers, the emergency dispatchers, BC Ambulance Service, RCMP, and the Emergency and Trauma teams at the Royal Columbian Hospital.

She is getting the best care possible. Without exception, the medical staff at the Royal Columbian Hospital have been professional and caring.

Thank you to Luc Portelance, President of the CBSA, and the entire CBSA family here and across Canada. The strength, support, and kinship that we have been shown has provided us with solace during this time.

Lori has always wanted a career in law enforcement and public safety. After years of working as a 911 operator in London, Ontario, she decided to pursue a career as a Border Services Officer. She was thrilled to be assigned to the Port of Douglas in July 2012 with the feeling that she was pursuing her dream career. She has been welcomed by her colleagues and loves her job.

Even after she was wounded, Lori’s first concern was for the safety of her fellow Officers and the public that she has dedicated her career to protect.

Lori acknowledges how difficult this time must be for the family and friends of Andrew Crews. Our thoughts and prayers are with them.

We would like to express our thanks to the Fire Fighters of New Westminster for providing our accommodations. We are grateful for the outpouring of cards, flowers, and letters of support from Lori’s colleagues and other agencies including Surrey Mayor Diane Watts, the Laval Police, Lori’s former colleagues at the Ontario Provincial Police, the United States Customs and Border Protection, Washington Governor Gregoire, the United States Consulate, and many others. Lori has read each of these messages of support and is deeply moved by the thoughtfulness and care expressed.

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