How has Marissa Mayer, Yahoo CEO, found motherhood?

"The baby's been way easier than everyone made it out to be," she said at an event celebrating Fortune's 'Most Powerful Women' on Tuesday. "I think I've been really lucky that way but I had a very easy, healthy pregnancy," she added.

Mayer, who assumed the CEO position in July 2012, has been a source of controversy regarding her decisions around motherhood ever since she announced her two-week maternity leave earlier this year.

Some disapproved of her decision, saying it might prompt businesses to expect the same of other women, or it would be to her child's detriment. Others said Mayer's choice was a sign of progress, or no one's business but her own. The Yahoo CEO gave birth to her first child, a son, on Sept. 30.

In Canada, new mothers take an average of 44 weeks off their jobs for maternity leave, according to MoneySense.

Mayer cited her ability to prioritize as the reason she can balance success in business and in her personal life.

At the Fortune event, she declared her priorities as "God, family and Yahoo — in that order," putting her spin on former Green Bay Packers head coach Vince Lombardi's famous quote.

For any new mothers reading, what do you think of Mayer's statement? Has motherhood really been easier than you expected? Or does she make light of the demands of having a new baby?

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The most influential women in tech, according to PeekYou.
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  • #9: Ellen Kullman, CEO Of DuPont

    PeekScore: 7.32 / 10.00 <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/ellen_kullman/78658725" target="_hplink">Ellen Kullman</a> began her <a href="http://www2.dupont.com/Our_Company/en_US/executives/kullman.html" target="_hplink">career at DuPont</a> about 24 years ago, working her way from marketing manager up through the ranks of executive vice president to president to her current position as CEO and chair of the board, which she began on January 1, 2009.

  • #8: Virginia Rometty, CEO And President Of IBM

    PeekScore: 7.60 / 10.00 <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/ginni_rometty/333679852" target="_hplink">Virginia "Ginni" Rometty</a> was appointed to her current positions as president and CEO of IBM <a href="http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/biography/10069.wss" target="_hplink">just this past year</a>, on January 1. One of her biggest accomplishments over the course of her 31-year career at IBM was the acquisition she led of consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers Consulting <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/26/technology/ibm-names-a-new-chief.html?pagewanted=all" target="_hplink">for $3.5 billion</a>.

  • #7: Cher Wang, Co-founder And Chairperson Of HTC

    PeekScore: 7.68 / 10.00 In addition to co-founding HTC Corp., <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/cher_wang/167494999" target="_hplink">Cher Wang</a> founded the computer processor supplier VIA Technologies, Inc. <a href="http://www.htc.com/www/about/#leadership" target="_hplink">in 1987</a>. Last October, <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericsavitz/2011/10/26/cher-wang-the-most-powerful-woman-in-wireless-takes-on-apple/" target="_hplink">Forbes named Wang</a> "The Most Powerful Woman In Wireless."

  • #6: Safra Catz, President Of Oracle

    PeekScore: 7.80 / 10.00 <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/safra_catz/51174974" target="_hplink">Safra Catz</a> assumed the role of president of hardware and software company Oracle <a href="http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/press/BoardofDirectors/016342.htm" target="_hplink">in January 2004</a>. <a href="http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2011/fortune/1109/gallery.highest_paid_women.fortune/index.html" target="_hplink">According to CNNMoney</a>, Catz is the highest paid woman in business, with total earnings of $42,095,887 in 2010.

  • #5: Ursula Burns, CEO Of Xerox

    PeekScore: 7.89 / 10.00 <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/ursula_burns/57999322" target="_hplink">Ursula Burns</a> joined Xerox <a href="http://news.xerox.com/pr/xerox/ursula-m-burns.aspx" target="_hplink">more than 30 years ago</a> as a mechanical engineering summer intern and has held her position as CEO since July 2009. Shortly after becoming CEO, she led the <a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125413413514545919.html" target="_hplink">$6.4 billion purchase</a> of Affiliated Computer Services, <a href="http://news.xerox.com/pr/xerox/ursula-m-burns.aspx" target="_hplink">the largest acquisition in Xerox history</a>.

  • #4: Susan Wojcicki, SVP Of Advertising At Google

    PeekScore: 8.00 / 10.00 <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/susan_wojcicki/76320003" target="_hplink">Susan Wojcicki's</a> run with Google started even before Google began. Back in 1998, Wojcicki rented out her garage -- the tech giant's birthplace -- to its co-founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/tech/techinvestor/corporatenews/2007-07-04-google-wojcicki_N.htm" target="_hplink">for $1,700 a month</a>. After Google got on its feet, Wojcicki served as <a href="http://www.crunchbase.com/person/susan-wojcicki" target="_hplink">its first marketing professional</a>, eventually reaching her current position as senior vice president of advertising <a href="http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/25/google-promotes-susan-wojcicki-advertising-executive/" target="_hplink">in October 2010</a>.

  • #3: Marissa Mayer, VP Of Location And Local Services At Google

    PeekScore: 8.22 / 10.00 At just 37 years old, <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/marissa_mayer/3429432" target="_hplink">Marissa Mayer</a> is the <a href="http://www.crunchbase.com/person/marissa-mayer" target="_hplink">youngest member</a> of Google's executive operating committee. The talented exec joined the Google team fresh out of Stanford <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/06/google-marissa-mayer-women-in-tech_n_891167.html" target="_hplink">back in 1999</a>.

  • #2: Sheryl Sandberg, COO Of Facebook

    PeekScore: 8.34 / 10.00 <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/sheryl_sandberg/365002232" target="_hplink">Sheryl Sandberg</a> also has some ties to Google -- she used to serve as the company's vice president of global online sales and operations. Nowadays, Sandberg is one of the most powerful women in tech as Facebook's COO, a position she <a href="http://allthingsd.com/20080304/sheryl-sandberg-will-become-coo-of-facebook/" target="_hplink">snagged in March 2008</a>.

  • #1: Meg Whitman, President And CEO Of Hewlett Packard

    PeekScore: 8.98 / 10.00 Since becoming HP's new president and CEO b<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/22/meg-whitman-hp-ceo_n_976597.html" target="_hplink">ack in September 2009</a>, <a href="http://www.peekyou.com/meg_whitman/50531455" target="_hplink">Meg Whitman</a> has made some bold moves -- most recently, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/20/hp-pc-printer_n_1367656.html" target="_hplink">Reuters revealed</a> her plans to combine the company's PC and printing divisions in order to streamline sales. While it's <a href="http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-meg-whitman-20120405,0,4066578.story" target="_hplink">still yet to be seen</a> whether Whitman can turn HP around, she certainly <a href="http://www8.hp.com/us/en/company-information/executive-team/meg-whitman.html" target="_hplink">has enough experience to help her out</a>: Prior to her current position, she served as president and CEO of eBay for 10 years, from 1998 to March 2008.

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