While Dalton McGuinty has his hands full with teachers walking off the job and a leadership race that will see him replaced, Ontario's Premier still found time to deliver a special holiday message on 22 Minutes.

Since times are tough, McGuinty is going to combine Toronto's Santa Claus, Caribana and Pride parades to save money.

"Nothing is going to say Christmas in Toronto like Santa Claus playing the steel drums in a festive Speedo."

McGuinty isn't the only premier delivering a satirical message on Tuesday's holiday special. The greetings from Alberta's Alison Redford, and Saskatchewan's Brad Wall have already made headlines and they will be joined on the show by every provincial and territorial premier except one.

Any guesses who the no-show is? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

The 22 Minutes holiday special will air on Tuesday Dec. 11 from 8:00-9:00 p.m. (This Hour Has 22 Minutes regularly airs on CBC TV Tuesday nights at 8:30 p.m.) Catch more clips of the show on Facebook and Twitter.

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