Rick Mercer is no fan of Canada’s new plastic bills.

“Our new money — the new plastic bills — they’re stupid,” Mercer said during his latest rant on the Rick Mercer Report. “I can’t think of another word for it.”

Mercer’s main issues with the new bills are that they won’t fold in your pocket, and that they tend to stick together.

“If you reach into your pants for your car keys, when your hand comes out the money tends to fly away, but that’s great because the polymer bills have the magical flight properties of miniature hang gliders,” Mercer quipped.

Mercer’s complaint about the bills sticking together is not new; some news reports have claimed the bills melt in extreme heat. (The Bank of Canada recently asserted that releasing details about the potential melting bills could endanger national security.)

Plastic currency, or polymer banknotes as they are technically known, aren’t a Canadian invention. They were first developed by the Reserve Bank of Australia, and have been in circulation down under since 1988.

But Australians, who live in a much hotter climate than Canada, seemed surprised by allegations that plastic bills melt. (Canada's bills may be produced differently.)

All the same, Mercer hopes — but doubts — the bills will prove to be a passing fad.

“Look, I'm not against progress, but this is progress run amok. I only hope that someday we will look back and say, do you remember when ... we had plastic money? Boy that was stupid. Thank God those days are over.

“No such luck. We are powerless here. It’s not like you can boycott money. The future is here and it is plastic. And sadly there's no cure for stupid.”

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  • Bank of Montreal Dollar - 1825

    Until the mid-19th century, Canada's future provinces used the "Canadian pound." Bit by bit, various jurisdictions began to switch to a metric system, and with it came the concept of the Canadian dollar. This Bank of Montreal-issued dollar bill is among the first bills called a dollar to have been printed.

  • Bank of Montreal Dollar - 1859

    Various banks printed their own currency until eventually the Bank of Montreal was charged with being the official issuer of the Canadian dollar, a practice that stayed in place until the Bank of Canada was created in the 1930s.

  • Bank of Toronto Dollar - 1859

    The Bank of Toronto (today known as TD Bank) was among many banks that issued Canadian dollars in the second half of the 19th century.

  • Ontario Bank Dollar - 1861

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Province of Canada Dollar - 1866

    The province of Canada comprised Ontario and Quebec and existed from 1841 to 1867. It issued its own currency. Image courtesy of Bank of Canada.

  • Dominion of Canada Dollar - 1870

    With confederation in 1867, the first truly national Canadian dollar came into being. Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Dominion of Canada Dollar - 1898

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Dominion of Canada Dollar - 1911

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Dominion of Canada Dollar - 1917

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Dominion of Canada Dollar - 1923

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Bank of Canada Dollar - 1935

    The Bank of Canada took over the issuance of currency from the Bank of Montreal when it was created in the 1930s. Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Bank of Canada Dollar - 1937

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Canada Dollar - 1954

    The 1954 dollar was the first to feature Queen Elizabeth II and the first to simply say "Canada" on it, rather than featuring the name of a bank, province or referring to the country as a "dominion."

  • Centennial Dollar - 1967

    Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • Canada Dollar - 1973

    This was the last paper dollar issued in Canada. It was in circulation until 1987, when the loonie replaced it. Image courtesy of the Bank of Canada.

  • The Loonie - 1987

    The loonie replaced the one-dollar bill in Canada in 1987. Image: CP

  • Canada 125 Loonie - 1992

    The Mint issued a special edition of the loonie in 1992 to commemorate the country's 125th birthday.

  • Vancouver Olympics Loonie - 2010

    An Inuit inukshuk graced the tail of this loonie issued in 2010 to coincide with the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver.

  • The Loonie - Anniversary Special - 2012

    The Royal Canadian Mint issued a special-edition version of the loonie in 2012 to commemorate the coin's 25th anniversary. Image: Royal Canadian Mint.