A little girl's trip to Subway recently turned into an emergency visit to the hospital after a mother allegedly made a disturbing discovery inside her daughter's sandwich.

Laura Clark, the mother of 3-year-old Aubrey, claims that her daughter suffered cuts to her mouth, cheeks and tongue after swallowing glass from half of a Subway six-inch turkey sandwich in Peterborough, Ontario, the Sun News reports.

The mother said that the doctor discovered several pieces of glass, some as big as half of a pinkie fingernail, in the rest of the uneaten sandwich. The damage to Aubrey’s mouth did not require stitches, but the next morning the three-year-old experienced bleeding and remains at risk of infection if any glass remains in her stomach.

In a statement emailed to The Huffington Post, Subway wrote:

“Food safety and the health and well-being of our customers is of paramount importance at every SUBWAY® restaurant and we take all such concerns very seriously. We are aware of the customer concern regarding a possible foreign object found in a sandwich. As soon as the restaurant owner learned of the issue, the proper parties were contacted, an investigation was begun, and the customer was contacted.”

This isn't the only problem currently facing Subway. The company, which recently was deemed the most well-perceived brand in the U.S. by a YouGov BrandIndex poll, came under fire this month after a customer discovered his Subway Footlong sub was only 11 inches long. The story only got worse once the company claimed that the name of the Footlong sub is "not intended to be a measurement of length.”

And most unfortunately, Aubrey is not the first toddler to fall victim to an unwelcome surprise found in fast food. A mother of a 4-year-old girl recently discovered a nose ring in her daughter's breakfast burrito from McDonald's.

Speaking of mealbreakers*, a woman claimed she discovered a razor blade in her McDonald's breakfast meal from an Illinois restaurant, and passengers aboard four separate Delta flights from Amsterdam discovered needles in their turkey sandwiches (one passenger was injured).

*Mealbreaker (n.): a nasty, non-edible surprise found in food while it is being eaten; often lawsuit-provoking, sometimes fabricated, always disgusting.

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  • McDonald's Grew During The Recession

    McDonald's had <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/business/moneybox/2009/08/who_won_the_recession.html" target="_hplink">higher sales growth in 2008</a> than in 2006 or 2007, opening nearly 600 stores that year, according to Slate. The chain was able to take advantage of Americans' recession tastes: Cheap, convenient food.

  • They Handle Food That Isn't Really Food

    One <a href="http://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/w2sv3/fast_food_workers_of_reddit_what_is_the_one_menu/" target="_hplink">Reddit user claiming to be an ex-McDonald's worker</a> said he once left a bag of chicken nuggets out on the counter for too long and "they melted. Into a pool of liquid." That didn't stop him from loving the nuggets, "still delicious," he wrote.

  • Fast Food Companies See Huge Profits On The Backs Of Low-Wage Workers

    More than <a href="http://www.nelp.org/page/-/Press Releases/2012/PR_MinWageCorpProfits.pdf?nocdn=1" target="_hplink">60 percent of low-wage workers</a> are employed by big corporations, according to a July analysis by the National Employment Law Project. And more than 90 percent of those companies were profitable last year.

  • The Average Pay For A Fast Food Worker In New York City Is $9 Per Hour

    Fast food workers in New York City make an <a href="http://blogs.villagevoice.com/forkintheroad/2012/11/fast_food_forward_strike_nyc.php" target="_hplink">average of $9 per hour</a>, according to the Village Voice. That comes to about $18,500 per year for full-time workers.

  • Fast Food Workers Are Unlikely To Get Paid Sick Days

    For 40 percent of private sector workers, <a href="http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2012-11-28/news/bs-ed-sick-leave-20121128_1_sick-days-care-workers-service-workers" target="_hplink">taking a sick day</a> and still getting paid isn't an option, according to the Baltimore Sun. Fast food workers are especially likely to be part of that 40 percent.

  • The Boss Can Threaten To Take Workers' Health Care Away

    Many fast food workers saw their health benefits put at risk this year, if they even had them at all. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/09/papa-johns-obamacare-john-schnatter_n_2104202.html" target="_hplink">Papa John's CEO John Schnatter</a> said he would likely reduce some of his workers hours so that he wouldn't have to cover them in response to Obamacare. Jimmy John's founder, Jimmy John Liautaud told Fox News in October that <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/on-air/your-world-cavuto/2012/10/16/jimmy-johns-founder-business-owners-unsure-future" target="_hplink">he would "have to" cut workers' hours</a> so that he wasn't forced to cover them under Obamacare.

  • The Average Hourly Pay At Many Fast Food Eateries Is Less Than $8 An Hour

    The average hourly pay at McDonald's, Wendy's, Burger King and Taco Bell is less than $8 an hour, according to <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/id/50015355" target="_hplink">salary data cited by CNBC</a>.

  • The Median Age Of A Fast Food Worker Is 28

    As more workers fight for limited jobs, many older employees are gravitating towards the fast food industry. The median age of a fast <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/11/mcjobs-should-pay-too-its-time-for-fast-food-workers-to-get-living-wages/265714/" target="_hplink">food worker is 28</a>, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data cited by the Atlantic. For women, who make up two-thirds of the industry's employees, that age is 32.

  • Labor Leaders Rarely Try To Unionize Fast Food Workers

    Fast food worker's went on strike in late November in New York City, showcasing a rare effort to organize the industry's workers. Labor leaders often don't make an effort to organize these workers because the high turnover makes the challenge daunting.

  • Fast Food Workers Are The Lowest Paid Workers In NYC

    For all their work, fast food workers get very little dough. The lowest paid job category in New York City is "Combined Food Service and Preparation Workers, Including Fast Food," according to Bureau of Labor Department Statistics <a href="http://www.salon.com/2012/11/29/in_rare_strike_nyc_fast_food_workers_walk_out/" target="_hplink">cited by Salon</a>.