Having the kids at home for a week during March Break presents a great opportunity to spend quality time together, try new activities and create long-lasting family memories. Of course, the prospect of keeping your children entertained for an entire week of downtime can also be overwhelming. The last thing you want is having antsy kids crawling up the walls and driving you crazy.

To help you keep your wits about you, we’ve compiled a list of seven great ways to keep the kids busy over March break. The best part? Most of these things to do can be enjoyed as a family or for kids only — when you need them out of your hair for a bit.

Loading Slideshow...
  • 1. Learn A New Board Game

    If you’ve been wondering what all the fuss surrounding <a href="http://www.catan.com/" target="_hplink">Settlers of Catan</a> is all about, now is the perfect chance to find out. The addictive German game is recommended for everyone over the age of 10, so you and the kids can learn how to settle Catan together. (And they can keep playing on their own when you need to sneak away for adult stuff.)

  • 2. Arts And Crafts

    Book a “craft party” at a local arts and crafts store like <a href="http://www.michaels.com/" target="_hplink">Michaels</a>: The kids will love the chance to unleash their creative sides with their friends, and other parents will owe you a favour for occupying their kids for a few hours. You can even pick up some supplies while you’re there so they can continue indulging their creative pursuits at home.

  • 3. Lego Projects

    Start building a Lego city. The kids can create a replica of your own town or a dream destination like Paris or New York. Or, if they’re feeling particularly ambitious, they can build a city straight out of their own imaginations. <a href="http://city.lego.com/en-us/" target="_hplink">The Lego City website</a> is a great place to start for inspiration.

  • 4. Local Camps

    Sign your little ones up for a local March Break camp, like a gymnastics retreat or a martial arts workshop. Cheer on their progress by getting them to show you what they’ve learned at the end of the day.

  • 5. City Or Nature Walk

    Go on a discovery walk in an historic part of town to sneak in some fresh air, exercise and even a bit of education. Create your own route by doing a little bit of research online first, or join an existing walking tour group.

  • 6. Hit The Library

    Many libraries offer special March Break programming for kids, like writing workshops and craft days. While the kids are brushing up on their skills, you can escape in that new romance or thriller you’ve been meaning to crack open.

  • 7. Go To The Movies

    Enjoy a family outing to the movie theatre. There are plenty of movies out that everyone can enjoy, like the animated intergalactic flick "Escape from Planet Earth", the much-anticipated prequel "Oz the Great and Powerful" and even the epic adaptation of the classic novel, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey", if you haven’t gotten around to seeing it yet.

  • NEXT: Great winter books to read

  • 'THE SECRET OF MAGIC' by Deborah Johnson

    "Passionate but never didactic, Johnson wisely allows the novel's politics to play second fiddle to the intimate, nuanced drama of the young black Yankee and middle-aged white Southerner in this provocative story about race in America that becomes a deeply felt metaphor for all human relationships." Mississippi-based author Johnson's second novel (<em>The Air Between Us</em>, 2008). <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/deborah-johnson/secret-of-magic/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'AN OFFICER AND A SPY' by Robert Harris

    "Espionage, counterespionage, a scandalous trial, a coverup and a man who tries to do right make this a complex and alluring thriller." Labyrinthine machinations having to do with the Dreyfus Affair, the late 19th-century spy case that disclosed a latent anti-Semitism in French culture. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/robert-harris/an-officer-and-a-spy/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'THE INVENTION OF WINGS' by Sue Monk Kidd

    "Kidd's portrait of white slave-owning Southerners is all the more harrowing for showing them as morally complicated, while she gives Handful the dignity of being not simply a victim, but a strong, imperfect woman." Kidd (<em>The Mermaid Chair</em>, 2005, etc.) hits her stride and avoids sentimental revisionism with this historical novel about the relationship between a slave and the daughter of slave owners in antebellum Charleston. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/sue-monk-kidd/invention-of-wings/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'LOVE & WAR: TWENTY YEARS, THREE PRESIDENTS, TWO DAUGHTERS AND ONE LOUISIANA HOME' by Mary Matalin, James Carville

    "A solid memoir of political lives from both sides of the spectrum." A strangely compelling dueling memoir by the improbably matched political couple. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/james-carville/love-war/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'ON SUCH A FULL SEA' by Chang-rae Lee

    "Welcome and surprising proof that there's plenty of life in end-of-the-world storytelling." A harrowing and fully imagined vision of dystopian America from Lee, who heretofore has worked in a more realist mode. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/chang-rae-lee/on-such-a-full-sea/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'MY AGE OF ANXIETY: FEAR, HOPE, DREAD, AND THE SEARCH FOR PEACE OF MIND' by Scott Stossel

    "Powerful, eye-opening and funny. Pitch-perfect in his storytelling, Stossel reminds us that, in many important ways, to be anxious is to be human." In this captivating and intimate book, the editor of the Atlantic spares no detail about his lifelong struggle with anxiety and contextualizes his personal experience within the history of anxiety's perception and treatment. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/scott-stossel/my-age-of-anxiety/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'I'LL TAKE YOU THERE: MAVIS STAPLES, THE STAPLE SINGERS, AND THE MARCH UP FREEDOM'S HIGHWAY' by Greg Kot

    "Through it all, the ebullience of Mavis Staples and her music shine through." A biography that will send readers back to the music of Mavis and the Staple Singers with deepened appreciation and a renewed spirit of discovery. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/greg-kot/ill-take-you-there-mavis-staples/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'LITTLE FAILURE: A MEMOIR' by Gary Shteyngart

    "Though fans of the author's fiction will find illumination, a memoir this compelling and entertaining—one that frequently collapses the distinction between comedy and tragedy—should expand his readership beyond those who have loved his novels." An immigrant's memoir like few others, with as sharp an edge and as much stylistic audacity as the author's well-received novels. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/gary-shteyngart/little-failure/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'RADIANCE OF TOMORROW' by Ishmael Beah

    "UNICEF Ambassador Beah writes lyrically and passionately about ugly realities as well as about the beauty and dignity of traditional ways." This first novel from Sierra Leone–born author Beah (<em>A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier,</em> 2007) features characters who face the challenges of returning to normalcy after the horrors of civil war in Sierra Leone. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/ishmael-beah/radiance-of-tomorrow/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

  • 'KIDS THESE DAYS' by Drew Perry

    "A funny, frenzied tale of a terrified man plummeting helplessly into his own adulthood." Meet Walter and Alice. They're screwed. <a href="https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/drew-perry/kids-these-days/" target="_blank">Read full book review ></a>

Learn A New Board Game: If you’ve been wondering what all the fuss surrounding Settlers of Catan is all about, now is the perfect chance to find out. The addictive German game is recommended for everyone over the age of 10, so you and the kids can learn how to settle Catan together. (And they can keep playing on their own when you need to sneak away for adult stuff.)

Arts And Crafts: Book a “craft party” at a local arts and crafts store like Michaels: The kids will love the chance to unleash their creative sides with their friends, and other parents will owe you a favour for occupying their kids for a few hours. You can even pick up some supplies while you’re there so they can continue indulging their creative pursuits at home.

Lego Projects: Start building a Lego city. The kids can create a replica of your own town or a dream destination like Paris or New York. Or, if they’re feeling particularly ambitious, they can build a city straight out of their own imaginations. The Lego City website is a great place to start for inspiration.

Local Camps: Sign your little ones up for a local March Break camp, like a gymnastics retreat or a martial arts workshop. Cheer on their progress by getting them to show you what they’ve learned at the end of the day.

City Or Nature Walks: Go on a discovery walk in an historic part of town to sneak in some fresh air, exercise and even a bit of education. Create your own route by doing a little bit of research online first, or join an existing walking tour group.

Hit The Library: Many libraries offer special March Break programming for kids, like writing workshops and craft days. While the kids are brushing up on their skills, you can escape in that new romance or thriller you’ve been meaning to crack open.

Go To The Movies: Enjoy a family outing to the movie theatre. There are plenty of movies out that everyone can enjoy, like the animated intergalactic flick "Escape from Planet Earth", the much-anticipated prequel "Oz the Great and Powerful" and even the epic adaptation of the classic novel, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey", if you haven’t gotten around to seeing it yet.

Also on HuffPost: