An Afghan woman has been shot dead by her father in front of a mob of hundreds, Amnesty International is reporting.

Her crime?

Dishonouring her family.

Amnesty only identifies the woman as Halima, adding that she was between the ages of 18 and 20 and had two children — and that she had run away with a cousin while her husband was in Iran.

The same cousin reportedly sent her back to her home village of Kookchaheel, in the Aabkamari district of the north-western Badghis province. Soon after a trio of village religious leaders issued a fatwa, or religious judgment, against her. She was shot dead on April 22.

In condemning her public execution, Amnesty's Afghanistan researcher Horia Mosadiq said, “Violence against women continues to be endemic in Afghanistan and those responsible very rarely face justice."

“Not only do women face violence at the hands of family members for reasons of preserving so-called ‘honour’, but frequently women face human rights abuses resulting from verdicts issued by traditional, informal justice systems. These systems must be reformed and the police must prevent such verdicts being carried out.”

Violence against women in Afghanistan shows no signs of fading, with the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission reporting more than 3,000 cases from March to October last year — a rise of nearly a third compared to the same period in 2011.

In March of this year, the UN special Envoy to Afghanistan Jan Kubis blamed the violence on Afghan culture.

“The majority is linked to domestic violence, tradition, culture of the country,” he told reporters at the United Nations in New York on March 19.

“Of course there are very clearly attacks on women’s activists by the insurgency,” he added. “Then there are unfortunate situations when indeed women are killed while doing their daily chores (by unexploded bombs).”

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  • Shawal Jamila,19, smokes a cigarette inside the women's prison October 22, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. Accused of bad behavior, she ran away from home with her boyfriend and has been in prison for five-month. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Zakiya

    In this Saturday, Oct. 19, 2002 file photo, Zakiya, 30, who is accused of adultery, sews while she holds her daughter Zohra, 1, on her lap at the women's prison in Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

  • Zarghona, Balal

    FILE -- In this Sunday, Jan. 19, 2003 file photo, Zarghona, who is in prison because she left her first husband who abused her and forced her into prostitution, holds her seven-month-old son Balal and looks out through their cell window, at the Kabul Women's Prison in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Suzanne Plunkett, File)

  • A female prisoner sits in her room holding one of the babies living at the prison named Sayed, 11-months-old, at the women's prison October 22, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Afghan Women's Prison in Mazar-E-Sharif

    Fariha, 20, washes her clothes inside the women's prison October 22, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. She is in prison for running away from home. According to Afghanistan's Ministry for Women and the Independent Human Rights Commission, many of the females that are incarcerated are being detained for 'moral crimes'. These so-called crimes include everything from running away from home, refusing to marry, marriage without proper family consent and attempted adultery. In the worst cases women are put away for many years, accused of murder when usually another person has actually commmited the crime. With the courts at many times refering to Islamic Sharia law, the court system in Afghanistan can be easily adapted to work against, in what many critics of Afghan law see, as the rights of Afghan women. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Afghan Women's Prison in Mazar-E-Sharif

    Sakina (L) , 4, and Khujesta,5, play inside the women's prison where they live with their mothers October 22, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Ahsa Gul holds her son Sayed, 11-months-old, inside the women's prison October 22, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Zuhra holds her son Sahil, five-months-old, inside her room at the women's prison October 21, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. Zuhra has been accused of killing her husband and unless lawyers can reverse the sentence she will serve atleast five years. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Fariha, 20 sweeps the courtyard inside the women's prison October 22, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

  • Female Afghan prisoners play volleyball at a prison in the eastern Afghan city of Herat on July 2, 2010. There are 110 women inmates at the main Herat jail. (Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Afghan prisoner lookd out from a fenced window at the Female Detention Centre in Kabul on March 30, 2010. (SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Afghan policeman (L) escorts prisoner

    An Afghan policeman (L) escorts prisoners and a child at the Female Detention Centre in Kabul on March 30, 2010. Some 145 women prisoners including 140 Afghans and five foreigners, who are serving sentences for a variety of crimes are held at the prison, which is the only detention facility in the Afghan capital solely for women. AFP PHOTO/SHAH Marai (Photo credit should read SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Afghan prisoners watch as another juggle

    Afghan prisoners watch as another juggles a ball at the Female Detention Centre in Kabul on March 30, 2010. Some 145 women prisoners including 140 Afghans and five foreigners, who are serving sentences for a variety of crimes are held at the prison, which is the only detention facility in the Afghan capital solely for women. AFP PHOTO/SHAH Marai (Photo credit should read SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images)