If the second episode of The Amazing Race Canada seemed more like the Amazing Race Vancouver, that's because the show looks like it has shifted from its province-hopping ways to focus on one city per episode.

This week's destination? Vancouver, or as the show's host, Jon Montgomery, called it: "the supermodel of North American cities." Vancouver often racks up accolades as the most livable (albeit expensive) city in North America, but also as a place that doesn't know how to have fun.

That's not to say this week's episode wasn't entertaining, but when you've got destinations like a convention centre and shipping yards instead of camera-friendly lakes and provincial parks, the city's "no fun" reputation starts creeping up. Still, what this week's episode lacked in natural beauty, it made up for in culture with contestants running (and skating) around in circles in Vancouver's historic Chinatown and the Richmond Olympic Oval.

For a recap of this week's drama, check out HuffPost Canada TV's review here and for a look at this week's destinations, check out the gallery below.

The Amazing Race Canada 2013 Destinations. Slideshow text follows for mobile readers.

Loading Slideshow...
  • Week 3: The Statue Of Outlaw

    Like <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/07/23/amazing-race-canada-2013-destinations_n_3640030.html?utm_hp_ref=amazing-race-canada" target="_blank">Vancouver's Millennium Gate</a>, one of the episode's first stops involved the statue of Outlaw. If you've ever wondered why there's a bronze statue of a bull in downtown Calgary, it pays homage to the city's ties to "western heritage and the entrepreneurialism, grit and determination symbolic of the capital markets," according to the CBC. The $450,000 sculpture is fashioned after an actual bull named Outlaw who bucked 71 riders during the 2004 Calgary Stampede before letting one rider hop on.

  • Week 3: The Royal Tyrrell Museum

    If you've watched this week's episode, you'll recognize this place as the spot that nearly cost married doctors Brett Burstein and Holly Agostino the race. Located near Drumheller, Alberta, over a third of the museum's 11,200 square meters is devoted to exhibits. The museum is widely renowned for its Dinosaur Hall with over 40 mounted dinosaur skeletons but is also home to a "Cretaceous Garden" filled with over 600 living species of plants and a to-scale replica of a 375-million-year-old reef.

  • Week 3: Ranchman’s Cookhouse

    Viewers know it as the spot that teams struggled to complete the line-dance roadblock, but Ranchman’s Cookhouse pegs itself as <a href="http://www.ranchmans.com/" target="_hplink">"Calgary's most iconic western bar"</a>. When it's not serving up ribs, chicken wings or steak, Ranchman’s Cookhouse is also a museum of rodeo memorabilia and photographs. Then there are the restaurant's dance lessons which range from beginner to West Coast Swing. Come for the 30 cent wings, stay for the lessons in beginner's double shuffle.

  • Week 3: Atlas Coal Line

    Another one of Drumheller, Alberta's attractions, the Atlas Coal Line is a national historic site designated to protect the last of Drumheller's mines. Regarded as one of Canada's major coal producing regions,<a href="http://www.atlascoalmine.ab.ca/history.html" target="_hplink"> these mines were responsible for 56,864,808 tons</a> of coal responsible for keeping Canadians warm until the mid 1960's.

  • Week 2: Olympic Oval

    The 2010 Winter Olympics are a distant memory but this Olympic facility is still home to athletes and the odd reality-show contestant who wipes out while speed skating. Located in Richmond B.C., the Olympic Oval now functions as a mixed sports centre complete with two Olympic-sized ice rinks, eight hard-wood ball courts, a gymnasium and 200-metre long track. When the Oval isn't attracting athletes, it can be seen from the skies flying into Vancouver. The building also gets two green thumbs up from architects for its unique roof, which was fashioned out of wood killed by B.C. pine beetles.

  • Week 2: Millenium Gate

    Viewers may know it as the spot that gave some contestants trouble, but this massive gate serves as the official entrance to Vancouver's Chinatown. The gate is <a href="http://www.venturevancouver.com/chinatown-millennium-gate" target="_hplink">decorated with Western and Eastern symbols and scriptures and stands as a testament to Vancouver's multiculturalism</a>. As for Vancouver's Chinatown, it earns international recognition as the largest Chinatown in Canada.

  • Week 2: DP World Vancouver

    The thought of visiting a shipping yard may not generate a lot of excitement for travellers or viewers (understandably), but DP World Vancouver generates a hefty amount of revenue. Those less fascinated with the intricacies of global shipping at marine terminals will want to <a href="http://www.dpworld.ca/www/index.php?idpage=17" target="_hplink">scale the two post-panamax container cranes or the 19 gantries (think long, elongated horse shoes with pulleys) which can stack shipping containers up to 8,000 feet high</a>.

  • Week 2: Vancouver Contention Centre

    It may be situated in one of Canada's largest urban centres but this convention centre prides itself for its eco-friendly behaviour. Located on Vancouver's waterfront, the Vancouver Convention Centre blends greenery and great planning with <a href="http://www.vancouverconventioncentre.com/about-us/fast-facts/" target="_hplink">a six-acre "living roof," which is made with thousands of indigenous plants and collects rainwater for irrigation</a>. Nearby sea water is used for heating and cooling the building and there's even a fish habitat built into the foundation.

  • Week 1: The Niagara Butterfly Conservatory

    While the thought of a butterfly zoo may not sound overly exciting, the numbers behind the Niagara Butterfly Conservatory are pretty impressive. The conservatory is <a href="conservatory/" target="_hplink">home to 2,000 tropical butterflies which are free to flutter around inside the 1,022 square meters of space.</a> The zoo is open 364 days of the year (butterflies get Christmas breaks too) and features a special netting which prevents the butterflies from getting too close to the glass, and <a href="http://www.niagarafrontier.com/butterfly.html" target="_hplink">dying of hypothermia during the winter seasons.</a>

  • Week 1: Lake Okanagan

    It's easy to understand why some teams had trouble navigating Lake Okanagan --<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okanagan_Lake" target="_hplink"> it's 351 square kilometres of fresh water</a>. Maybe that's why it's been so difficult to find any hard evidence of the lake's fabled monster, Ogopogo. This week's episode featured a statue of the mythical lake monster as part of a challenge which involved contestants taking a dive into the lake's 232-meter deep waters in search of the race's next clue. The city of Kelowna, B.C. also boasts its own Ogopogo statue in the downtown core.

  • Week 1: Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park

    Established in 2001, Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park captures a solid mix of the Okanagan Valley. The park is <a href="http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/myra/" target="_hplink">7,829 hectares in size</a> -- the size of about 9,603 football fields -- which protects the Myra Canyon, and draws visitors to its spectacular view of the Okanagan Valley. The park is a big hit with bikers and hikers thanks to its <a href="http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/myra/nat_cul.html#history" target="_hplink">16 wood-frame trestles</a>. Just don't expect to go bungie jumping off of them.

  • Quails' Gate Winery

    Take a 30-second shot of the Quails' Gate Winery in the B.C.'s Okanagan Valley are it's easy to see why the locals drive around with "Beautiful British Columbia" on their licence plates. The winery is a staple for Okanagan's agriculture tourism and <a href="http://johnschreiner.blogspot.ca/2012/08/quails-gates-owners-gain-sonoma-winery.html" target="_hplink">churns out 50,000 cases of wine</a> a year.

Olympic Oval
The 2010 Winter Olympics are a distant memory but this Olympic facility is still home to athletes and the odd reality-show contestant who wipes out while speed skating. Located in Richmond B.C., the Olympic Oval now functions as a mixed sports centre complete with two Olympic-sized ice rinks, eight hard-wood ball courts, a gymnasium and 200-metre long track. When the Oval isn't attracting athletes, it can be seen from the skies flying into Vancouver. The building also gets two green thumbs up from architects for its unique roof, which was fashioned out of wood killed by B.C. pine beetles.

Millennium Gate
Viewers may know it as the spot that gave some contestants trouble, but this massive gate serves as the official entrance to Vancouver's Chinatown. The gate is decorated with Western and Eastern symbols and scriptures and stands as a testament to Vancouver's multiculturalism. As for Vancouver's Chinatown, it earns international recognition as the largest Chinatown in Canada.

DP World Vancouver
The thought of visiting a shipping yard may not generate a lot of excitement for travellers or viewers (understandably), but DP World Vancouver generates a hefty amount of revenue. Those less fascinated with the intricacies of global shipping at marine terminals will want to scale the two post-panamax container cranes or the 19 gantries (think long, elongated horse shoes with pulleys) which can stack shipping containers up to 8,000 feet high.

Vancouver Convention Centre
It may be situated in one of Canada's largest urban centres but this convention centre prides itself for its eco-friendly behaviour. Located on Vancouver's waterfront, the Vancouver Convention Centre blends greenery and great planning with a six-acre "living roof," which is made with thousands of indigenous plants and collects rainwater for irrigation. Nearby sea water is used for heating and cooling the building and there's even a fish habitat built into the foundation.

Where should contestants on the Amazing Race head to next week? Let us know in the comment section below or on Twitter at @HPCaTravel

Related on HuffPost: