Brace yourself, America, because the following two facts may cause a rift between our two great countries and even the space-time continuum itself: Canada has its very own Thanksgiving and it even falls on a different day than yours.

Sorry for the shock. Now we can —if that's alright with you, of course — break down the differences between our two holidays.

For starters, Canadian Thanksgiving is the second Monday of October, the same date as your Columbus Day. Your Thanksgiving, as you surely know, is on the fourth Thursday of November. That's dangerously close to Christmas, which we also have.

Even though turkey is the most common meal on Canadian Thanskgiving, it isn't mandatory grub. Plenty of families have ham, dim sum, chicken or, you know, whatever they feel like.

We're not saying our Thanksgiving is better. We just want you to know about it as much as we know about yours, which is a lot.

Check out the slideshow below for more differences between Canadian and American Thanksgivings:

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  • Canada-US Thanksgiving Differences

    Here are some things that distinguish our Thanksgiving from its American counterpart. Happy Thanksgiving to Canada and happy future Thanksgiving to the U.S. (which is on November 28.)

  • We have much less football

    Canada has the Thanksgiving Day Classic, an annual doubleheader between four CFL teams. That's all we need. America goes big and <a href="http://www.nfl.com/thanksgiving" target="_blank">has this</a>.

  • It's not associated with shopping

    America has Black Friday, while we have a little something we like to call the Tuesday after Thanksgiving.

  • We don't have fancy Thanksgiving TV specials

  • We like to get out of the city

    We're not bragging about our serene outdoors, but we kind of are.

  • Canadian Thanksgiving's origins aren't dramatic at all

    We really don't have much of a cool backstory to it. More associated with European harvest celebrations than the arrival of pilgrims in America, Canadian Thanksgiving started with an English navigator being thankful for having what he needed, although in the past Canada's used the occasion to mark specific events like the passing of cholera or an English king overcoming an illness.

  • We made it official in 1957

    Canadian Thanksgiving fell on various days throughout Canada's history. In fact, the very first thanksgiving after confederation was in April. But in 1957 the government made the <a href="http://www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1359131492589/1359131766879" target="_blank">second Monday of October the official date, even though it fell on that date since 1931.</a>

  • We even have a list of reasons for Thanksgiving

    Seriously. In 1814, it was for <a href="http://www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1359131492589/1359131766879" target="_blank">"glorious victories over our enemies."</a>

  • Happy Thanksgiving

    No matter what side of the border you're on, what you eat, how much sports and shopping you enjoy or what day you have it, we hope you have a most excellent Thanksgiving.

  • NEXT:

    Things We Wish Americans Knew About Canada

  • We Speak English And French, Not Canadian

  • But We Don't All Speak French

  • Or English

  • We Didn't Make Celine Dion, Nickelback And Justin Bieber Famous. You Did

  • We Don't Know Your Cousin Mike From Vancouver

  • British Columbia Is Not In Britain. Or South America. (Google it)

  • We Know More About America Than You Do About Canada

  • Sofa, Not Couch

  • Pop, Not Soda

  • Bathroom, Not Washroom

  • We Don't All Know How To Ski/Skate/Dogsled

  • It's Pronounced 'ZED'

  • Not All Of Us Like Hockey

  • We Don't All Want To Move To America

  • Our Mayors, For The Most Part, Don't (Allegedly) Smoke Crack

  • We're Sick Of Emailing Fox News About This, So For The Last Bloody Time, The 9/11 Bombers Did NOT Cross Over From Canada!

  • Next: The Most Canadian Words

  • Toonie

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> A toonie is a $2 Canadian coin, which followed the cue of the loonie (named after the image of the aquatic bird that graces the $1 coin). <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Hey buddy, can I borrow a toonie? I need to get a Double Double (see the next slide)."

  • Double Double

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> A Double Double refers to a coffee (often from Tim Hortons) with two creams and two sugars. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Yes, hi, I'd like to order a Double Double."

  • Gut-Foundered

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> When food, however unappealing it is, is all you <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/05/10/newfoundland-tourism-video-gutfoundered_n_3254578.html" target="_blank">crave at the end of the day. Or, you're just very hungry.</a> <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> “Your mind wanders when it’s gut-foundered. Is it going to be take-out? Is it going to be pizza?”

  • Shit-Kickers

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong>Shit-Kickers are nicknames for cowboy boots. Hee Haw! <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "I can't go to the Calgary Stampede without my shit-kickers."

  • Kitty-Corner

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Something that is in a diagonal direction from something else. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "The grocery store is kitty-corner to the school."

  • Chinook

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> A warm wind that blows east over the Canadian Rockies, warming up Calgary in the winter. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "This chinook is giving me a headache."

  • Darts

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> A slang term for cigarettes <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Get your darts out."

  • Stagette

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Stagette is another name for bachelorette party. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Are you heading out to that stagette this weekend? There's going to be a stripper."

  • Cowtown

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Cowtown is a nickname for Calgary. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "I've been living in Cowtown my entire life."

  • Gitch/Gotch

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Another name for underwear used mainly in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and often referring to men's or boys' briefs. A gotch refers to women's underwear. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Pull your pants up, I can see your gitch."

  • Bedlamer

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> According to the Dictionary of Newfoundland, a bedlamer is a <a href="http://www.heritage.nf.ca/dictionary/azindex/pages/291.html" target="_blank">seal that is not yet mature.</a> <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "This harp seal is giving me a hard time, it's such a bedlamer."

  • Toque

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> A toque is a hat most people wear during winter months. And sometimes, you will see this hat reappear in the summer. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Listen son, don't go out into this weather without your toque."

  • Matrimonial Cake

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> No, no one is getting married. In Western Canada, a matrimonial cake is another term for a date square or tart. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "I wish this coffee shop had matrimonial cakes."

  • Rink Rat

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Someone who loves spending time on an ice rink. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "I can't get any ice time, I have to deal with all these rink rats."

  • Homo Milk

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Slang for homogenized whole milk, but shockingly, this term is actually used on milk packaging. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "When you go to the grocery store, don't forget to pick up the homo milk."

  • Two-Four

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Common slang for a case of 24 beers. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Are you heading to the beer store? Pick me up a 2-4 of Molson."

  • Pencil Crayon

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> The Canadian way of saying coloured pencil. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Do you have a pencil crayon in that pencil case?"

  • Pop

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Another word for soda. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "That can of pop has 200 calories."

  • Washroom

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Another word for bathroom or restroom. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "This washroom doesn't have any toilet paper."

  • Whaddya At

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Slang for "what are you doing" in Newfoundland. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "Did you just get in? Whaddya at?"

  • Mickey

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> For the most part, a mickey is a flask-sized (or 375 ml) bottle of hard liqueur, but on the East Coast, a mickey is an airplane-sized bottle. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "We're going out tonight, can someone grab a mickey."

  • Zed

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Not a slang term, but this is how Canadians pronounce the letter "Z". Not zee.

  • Deke

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> A hockey (surprise, surprise) technique when a player gets past their opponent by "faking it." It can also be used to replace the world detour. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "I am going to deke into the store after work."

  • Hydro

    <strong>WHAT IT MEANS:</strong> Hydro refers to electricity, particularly on your energy bill. <strong>IN A SENTENCE:</strong> "My hydro bill went up $10 this month."