An editorial by British street artist Banksy criticizes New York skyscraper One World Trade Center, and disses Canada in the process.

In an op-ed meant for the New York Times but rejected by the paper, the anonymous artist slams the “shy skyscraper,” saying it looks Canadian.

“That building is a disaster. Well no, disasters are interesting. One World Trade Center is a non-event. It’s vanilla. It looks like something they would build in Canada,” he wrote.

The building replaces the World Trade Center Twin Towers, and is a “symbol of renewal,” according to architect David Childs. It is the world’s fourth tallest skyscraper at 104 storeys, the Telegraph reported, and is scheduled to open in early 2014.

In the editorial, Banksy goes on to call the building “104 floors of compromise.”

“It would be easy to view One World Trade Center as a betrayal of everyone who lost their lives on September 11th, because it so clearly proclaims the terrorists won. Those 10 men have condemned us to live in a world more mediocre than the one they attacked, rather than be the catalyst for a dazzling new one,” he wrote.

His comments have angered 9/11 victims’ families, according to the Toronto Sun.

Former fire department of New York deputy chief Jim Riches, who lost his son on the day of the attack, said Banksy is “insulting to everybody in New York, especially people that died that day.”

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  • A man poses in front of Banksy's latest work October 18, 2013 in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City. The British street artist Banksy has been creating new street art for the month of October in New York. This is a collaboration with Brazilian street art duo Os Gemeos. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

  • Work by British graffiti artist Banksy is displayed on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The building owner has hired security guards and installed a metal gate to protect a work by Banksy. Cara Tabachnick, whose family owns the building, said the goal is to preserve the artwork "so it can be viewed and enjoyed." Most of the Banksy works that have gone up have been tagged over by others, and some have been completely erased. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said last week that graffiti ruins property and is "a sign of decay." (AP Photo/Alyssa Goodman)

  • Work By British Street Artist Banksy Continues To Appear On NYC Streets

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 07: A woman poses with a piece of street art, which depicts a heart-shaped balloon covered in bandages and was allegedly done by the street artist Banksy, on October 7, 2013 in the Red Hook neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The piece was defaced with red spray paint shortly after being completed. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • British Street Artist Banksy Announces A Month Of New Works On NYC Streets

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 03: A new Bansky work is viewed on a side of a wall stating 'This is My New York Accent' on October 3, 2013 in New York City. New work by the mysterious British street artist Banksy has appeared in New York after he announed a a month-long residency in the city. Three works in total have appeared in recent days with two of them quickly being vandalized by other graffiti. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

  • British Street Artist Banksy Announces A Month Of New Works On NYC Streets

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: A pedestrian looks toward street art reading, 'Playground Mob, The Musical,' allegedly done by the British street artist Banksy, in the Lower East Side on October 4, 2013 in New York City. Earlier this week Banksy announced he would be creating new street art for a month in New York. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • Graffiti painted in white by the secretive British artist Banksy, already "tagged" over by another artist, is on display on Friday, Oct. 4, 2013 in New York. Banksy graffiti is turning up on the streets of the city and all over social media. Banksy announced on his website that he is undertaking “an artists residency on the streets of New York” this month. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • Graffiti by the secretive British artist Banksy, featuring a dog and a fire plug, draws attention on 24th Street, near Sixth Avenue in New York, on Friday, Oct. 4, 2013. Banksy graffiti is turning up on the streets of the city and all over social media. Banksy announced on his website that he is undertaking “an artists residency on the streets of New York” this month. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • Work By British Street Artist Banksy Continues To Appear On NYC Streets

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 09: The latest work from street artist Banksy is seen through a chain link fence on October 9, 2013 in the Lower East Side neighborhood of New York City. Banksy is in the midst of creating a month long series of pieces of street art. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • MORE: One World Trade Center Spire

  • The final piece of spire, right, is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be added to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The final piece of spire is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be added to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • In this photo provided by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, one of the last two segments of the silver spire to be installed on top of One World Trade Center is hoisted to the top of the building on Thursday, May 2, 2013. With the spire as its crown, the trade center will soar to a symbolic 1,776 feet in the air, a reference to the birth of the nation in 1776. (AP Photo/Port Authority of New York and New Jersey) MANDATORY CREDIT: PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY

  • The final piece of spire is hoisted in place on top of One World Trade Center, Friday, May 10, 2013 in New York. The addition of the spire, and its raising of the building’s height to 1,776 feet, would make One World Trade Center the tallest structure in the U.S. and third-tallest in the world. (AP photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The final piece of spire is hoisted in place on top of One World Trade Center, Friday, May 10, 2013 in New York. The addition of the spire, and its raising of the building’s height to 1,776 feet, would make One World Trade Center the tallest structure in the U.S. and third-tallest in the world. (AP photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Iron workers pose for photos on the roof of One World Trade center before the final piece of spire is hoisted in place, Friday, May 10, 2013 in New York. The addition of the spire, and its raising of the building’s height to 1,776 feet, would make One World Trade Center the tallest structure in the U.S. and third-tallest in the world. (AP photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Iron workers gather on the roof of One World Trade center to watch as the final piece of spire is hoisted in place, Friday, May 10, 2013 in New York. The addition of the spire, and its raising of the building’s height to 1,776 feet, would make One World Trade Center the tallest structure in the U.S. and third-tallest in the world. (AP photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Iron workers gather on the roof of One World Trade center after the final piece of spire was hoisted in place, Friday, May 10, 2013 in New York. The addition of the spire, and its raising of the building’s height to 1,776 feet, would make One World Trade Center the tallest structure in the U.S. and third-tallest in the world. (AP photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The final piece of spire is hoisted in place on top of One World Trade Center, Friday, May 10, 2013 in New York. The addition of the spire, and its raising of the building’s height to 1,776 feet, would make One World Trade Center the tallest structure in the U.S. and third-tallest in the world. (AP photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • One World Trade Center stands at its full height above the New York City skyline in this view from the Heights neighborhood of Jersey City, N.J., Friday, May 10, 2013. A 408-foot spire was set into place at the top of the structure Friday, making the building a symbolic 1,776 feet tall. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Workers prepare to raise the silver spire atop the 1 World Trade Center building in New York early Friday May 10, 2013. The 408-foot spire will serve as a world-class broadcast antenna. An LED-powered light emanating from it will be seen from miles away. When it is fully installed on the building’s roof, it will bring the iconic structure to its full, symbolic height of 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • A 408-foot spire is set into place at the top of One World Trade Center seen from the Heights neighborhood of Jersey City, N.J., Friday, May 10, 2013. With the spire, the building rises at a symbolic 1,776 feet tall. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Workers pose for a photo prior to raising the silver spire atop the 1 World Trade Center building in New York early Friday May 10, 2013. The 408-foot spire will serve as a world-class broadcast antenna. An LED-powered light emanating from it will be seen from miles away. When it is fully installed on the building’s roof, it will bring the iconic structure to its full, symbolic height of 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • A 408-foot spire is set into place at the top of One World Trade Center seen from the Heights neighborhood of Jersey City, N.J., Friday, May 10, 2013. With the spire, the building rises at a symbolic 1,776 feet tall. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • A crane lifts into place a 408-foot spire at the top of One World Trade Center seen from the Heights neighborhood of Jersey City, N.J., Friday, May 10, 2013. With the spire, the building rises at a symbolic 1,776 feet tall. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • The top piece of the 408-foot spire for One World Trade Center is lifted to the top of the building in New York, Thursday, May 2, 2013. When it's fully installed, at a later date, it will top the building at a symbolic 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • A harness is lowered to the final piece of spire before it is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The top piece of the 408-foot spire for One World Trade Center is lifted to the top of the building in New York, Thursday, May 2, 2013. When installed it will top the building at a symbolic 1776 feet. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Tommy Hickey

    Ironworker Tommy Hickey holds a guide rope as the final piece of spire is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Construction workers watch as the final piece of spire is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The final piece of the spire is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The top piece of the 408-foot spire for One World Trade Center is lifted to the top of the building in New York, Thursday, May 2, 2013. When it's fully installed, at a later date, it will top the building at a symbolic 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • A worker holds a guide rope as the final piece of spire is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Workers attach a harness to the final piece of spire before it is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The final piece of spire is hoisted to the roof of One World Trade Center, Thursday, May 2, 2013 in New York. The piece will be attached to the spire at a later date, capping off the tower at 1,776 feet. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Construction workers watch as the final sections of the spire is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Construction workers watch as the final sections of the spire is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • The final sections of the spire is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Ironworker Tommy Hickey (L) holds a rope as the final sections of the spire is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Ironworker Tommy Hickey (L) holds a rope as the final sections of the spire is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Construction workers watch as the final sections of the spire is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • The final sections of the spire (R) is raised to the top of One World Trade Center May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • The final sections of the spire (R of center) is raised to the top of One World Trade Center (bottom) May 2, 2013 in New York to a temporary work platform atop the structure. Ironworkers will install the sections at a later date and when complete, One WTC will stand 1,776 feet (541 meters) high, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Cranes work adjacent to the spire on top of One World Trade Center, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. The last piece of spire will be hoisted to the roof on Thursday, weather permitting, according to a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The top piece of the 408-foot spire for One World Trade Center is shown at ground level, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. The piece will be hoisted to the roof on Thursday, weather permitting, according to a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The top piece of the 408-foot spire for One World Trade Center, left, is shown at ground level, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. The piece will be hoisted to the roof on Thursday, weather permitting, according to a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Cranes work adjacent to the spire on top of One World Trade Center, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. The last piece of spire will be hoisted to the roof on Thursday, weather permitting, according to a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • A detail of the top piece of the 408-foot spire for One World Trade Center is shown at ground level, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. The piece will be hoisted to the roof on Thursday, weather permitting, according to a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Construction cranes work on top of One World Trade Center, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. Officials with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey are hoping that the final pieces of the spire will be installed soon, making the tower 1776 feet tall. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Cranes work adjacent to the spire on top of One World Trade Center, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 in New York. The last piece of spire will be hoisted to the roof on Thursday, weather permitting, according to a spokesperson for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

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    This 11-story building near Toronto's Queen West, developed by BSäR Group Of Companies and Prince Bay Developments, is meant to reflect the "building-block" feel of other buildings in the neighbourhood, such as the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Ontario College of Art and Design. Expected completion date: January 2013.

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