It appears Rob Anders still believes Nelson Mandela was a terrorist.

The outspoken Conservative MP was the sole parliamentarian to vote against making Mandela an honorary citizen in 2001, preventing the motion from passing unanimously.

Anders, a Canadian Alliance MP at the time, infamously labeled the anti-apartheid leader and former South African president "a terrorist and a Communist."

"Nelson Mandela advocated violence and used violence to achieve his aims," he said. "It is very politically correct to go ahead and lionize him, but there are problems in South Africa today and we are glossing over these things."

Then-Prime Minister Jean Chretien responded by blasting Anders as "stupid."

On Friday, Global News reporter Laura Stone wrote that she asked Anders if his position on Mandela has softened over the years.

"I wish South Africa peace," he told her.

Anders also referred her to a Mandela obituary from the David Horowitz Freedom Center, a conservative foundation in the United States.

The obit argues Mandela left behind a mess in South Africa and isn't worthy of the "unhinged adoration" he has received across the political spectrum.

"Mandela began as a terrorist and never turned his back on monsters like Arafat and Castro, whom he considered brothers in arms," Horowitz writes.

Stone sought out an interview with Anders but the MP suggested his views about Mandela are clear.

But many other Conservative MPs and ministers shared condolences after Mandela passed away Thursday.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper paid tribute to Mandela in the House of Commons and even received a handshake from NDP Leader Tom Mulcair after his speech.

"The world has lost one of its great moral leaders and statesmen," Harper said.

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  • OTTAWA, CANADA: Nelson Mandela greets people as he walks with Prime Minister Brian Mulroney on his arrival in Ottawa on June 17, 1990 for a three-day visit to Canada.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: Nelson Mandela walks with Prime Minister Brian Mulroney on his arrival in Ottawa, on June 17, 1990 for a three-day visit to Canada.

  • South African anti-apartheid leader and African National Congress (ANC) member Nelson Mandela arrives in Ottawa, Canada, for an official visit on June 17, 1990.

  • South African anti-apartheid leader and African National Congress (ANC) member Nelson Mandela arrives in Ottawa, Canada, for an official visit on June 17, 1990.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: A Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer helps South African President Nelson Mandela (C) off a carriage on Sept. 23 during a welcoming ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Canada.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South Africa President Nelson Mandela (C) reviews the Canadian military guard of honour on Sept. 23 during a welcoming ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Canada. Mandela is on a three-day state visit to Canada.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South Africa President Nelson Mandela (L front) and his wife Graca Machel (R front) wave to the crowd during a welcoming ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Canada, on Sept. 23.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela kisses Lekgetho Makena, a local resident, on the hand during a welcoming ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Canada on Sept. 23. Mandela and his wife Graca Machel (background) are on a three-day state visit to Canada.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela acknowledges a standing ovation in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Sept. 24, 1998. The president received the ovation on his arrival in the House by all members of Parliament, including Trade Minister Sergio Marchi (top left) Diane Marleau, (centre) International Cooperation Minister and Prime Minister Jean Chretien (right).

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela addresses the Canadian Parliament on Sept. 24, 1998 in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Canada. Mandela is on a three-day state visit to Canada.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela smiles after receiving an honorary Investiture into the Order of Canada at a ceremony in Ottawa on Sept. 24, 1998. It is the first time a foreign Head of State has received the award.

  • OTTAWA, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela is congratulated by Governor General Romeo LeBlanc and applauded by Prime Minister Jean Chretien after receiving an honorary Investiture into the Order of Canada at a ceremony in Ottawa on Sept. 24, 1998. It is the first time a foreign head of state has received the award.

  • TORONTO, CANADA: Canadians show their poster of South African President Nelson Mandela at the the Toronto's SkyDome on Sept. 25, 1998 where Mandela launched the 'Canadian Friends of the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund.' Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien also attended.

  • TORONTO, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela addresses some 40,000 youths at the the Toronto's SkyDome launching 'Canadian Friends of the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund' on Sept. 25, 1998 in Toronto. Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien also attended.

  • TORONTO, CANADA: South African President Nelson Mandela (C) embraces two of the 40,000 youths who attended the 'Canadian Friends of the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund' launching ceremony at the Toronto SkyDome on Sept. 25, 1998.

  • HULL, CANADA: Former South African president Nelson Mandela and Prime Minister Jean Chretien are flanked by RCMP constables in Hull, Quebec, as they pose for photographs across the river from the Parliament Buildings. Mandela was presented with an honorary Canadian Citizenship on Monday November 19, 2001.

  • HULL, CANADA: Former South African President Nelson Mandela (R) waves to well wishers with Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien (L) on Nov. 19, 2001 after receiving his honorary Canadian Citizenship at a ceremony in Hull, Quebec just outside Ottawa. The distinction has been awarded only once before -- posthumously to Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, for saving the lives of some 100,000 Jews during World War II. This is the third visit to Canada for Mandela, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993.

  • HULL, CANADA: Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien (R) and former South African President Nelson Mandela (L) wave on Nov. 19, 2001 as they arrive at a ceremony in Hull, Quebec. Mandela received an honorary Canadian Citizenship. The only other recipient of an honorary Canadian citizenship was the late Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg. That award, for Wallenberg's work to save Hungarian Jews from Nazi concentration camps during World War II, was granted posthumously in 1985.

  • HULL, CANADA: Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien (C) shakes hands with Former South African President Nelson Mandela (R) on Nov. 19, 2001 after Mandela received his honorary Canadian Citizenship at a ceremony in Hull, Quebec. Graca Machel (L), wife of Mandela, looks on.

  • HULL, CANADA: Former South African President Nelson Mandela (R) waves to well wishers with Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien (L) on Nov. 19, 2001 at a ceremony honouring him as a Canadian Citizen in Hull, Quebec. The only other recipient of an honorary Canadian citizenship was the late Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg. That award, for Wallenberg's work to save Hungarian Jews from Nazi concentration camps during World War II, was granted posthumously in 1985.

  • HULL, CANADA: Former South African President Nelson Mandela smiles as he receives his honorary Canadian Citizenship in Hull, Quebec on Nov. 19, 2001. The only other recipient of an honorary Canadian citizenship was the late Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg. That award, for Wallenberg's work to save Hungarian Jews from Nazi concentration camps during World War II, was granted posthumously in 1985.

  • NEXT: Canadian politicians react to Mandela's death